Tag Archives: holiday

The Wandering Genealogist takes a break

30 Jun

I have decided to give myself a break from blogging for the next few months.

I am not sure if it will be a complete break or whether I will just excuse myself from my daily blogging schedule, either way I want to take a break from the “demands” of blogging for a while.

There are several other projects (other than family history) that I want to work on, but most of all I want a bit more spare time to do some walking.

Hopefully the weather is improving and I need to get some more miles under my belt if I am going to walk the South Downs Way again this year.

Then of course there is the upcoming London 2012 Olympics, which is going to mean a few long days when I am simply not going to have the time to blog.

All in all I want to take a break and not have to “worry” about blogging.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
.

My Family History Fortnight: Sunday 10th June 2012

10 Jun

There is not a lot of family history activity to report for the last two weeks. The fact that I have left it for two weeks shows just how family history free my time has been. There was a good excuse last for last week’s inactivity, but the week before was really just down to me being lazy.

Holidays galore

I had hoped that the long bank holiday weekend last weekend would provide some time for me to do some work, but there was so much else going on that I never really got down to any research.

On top of that the end of this week has seen my wife and I away for another long weekend, primarily for me to indulge my passion for trains, but also as an excuse to get away for a few days.

Percy Ebenezer Trower

Much of my recent blogging has centred around my 2x great-uncle Percy Ebenezer Trower. Although this wasn’t really a conscious decision on my part, it probably stems from the fact that in the absence of any new research I have been “forced” to go back and look at information I already have.

In particular I keep returning to the fact that I really ought to transcribe his diary. Whilst it is useful to be able to look up particular dates and events it is not possible to search the entire volume without having an idea of the date. I fear there is so much more of interest that could be uncovered if only it was transcribed and possibly indexed, or at least searchable.

The sheer scale of the task and Percy’s handwriting has put me off up to now, but I feel now might be a good time to start.

Adding birth and death details

The other thing that I have looked at is the lack of birth and death details for many of the people in my family tree.

I want to be able to do a bit more querying of my database, so that I can produce lists of people to search for things like First World War service and Probate Index entries.

For this I really need to establish the starting and ending points for the people in the database. This means I need a birth/baptism and burial/death record for each individual.

This is not something that is going to happen quickly, some should be quite easy to work out, but some of the deaths could be difficult to pin down with any confidence without getting a death certificate, which is nothing something I really can afford to do.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
.

It’s been a bad week for my family history… so far

21 Apr

Once again I seem to have achieved very little this week when it comes to family history, in fact I don’t really know where the time has gone.

I have done much thinking about family history, but not much real work. That thinking about family history usually pays off in the long run, it usually helps me organise my thoughts and plan the way forward on particular projects.

I know what I need to do next with the NICHOLLS/DRAPPER families from Kent, a little bit more research from home using the IGI and the census to build up a basic framework and then head for an archive or library to check some copies of the original parish registers.

I know that project is going to grind to a halt shortly as I wait for the opportunity to visit that archive or library, so I have lined up my next project, working on Thomas WELLER and his wife (possibly Mary NEWNHAM). This puts me back on home territory (Sussex) again and hopefully I should be able to make some progress on this without too many problems.

The next step for Thomas and Mary WELLER is to prove I have found the correct marriage, I should be able to do this by ordering the birth certificate of one of their children. I would like it to be Mary Ann WELLER my 3x great-grandmother but I am having trouble finding the correct reference, so it might have to be one of her brothers.

The good news is that the long Easter weekend means that I should have opportunity to get on with some family history. Unfortunately I can’t spend all four days on my family history, but should have enough time to get a decent amount done.

Getting my family history research “on track”

21 Jul

My recent holiday re-awakened my love of steam trains and heritage railways. Down in Devon we travelled on two steam railways, the South Devon Railway and the Paignton and Dartmouth Steam Railway. We also got to see Tornado, the first mainline steam locomotive built in Britain for almost 50 years.

Peppercorn "A1" Pacific 60163 Tornado at Paignton, Devon

Peppercorn "A1" Pacific 60163 Tornado at Paignton, Devon

Naturally (for me anyway) I now want to find some way of linking this love of trains into my family history research. Three possible options came to mind:

  1. “Cousin” George throwing coal from the train – my father tells a story about “cousin” George, who was an engine driver and during the Second World War he would throw lumps of coal from the footplate when he was nearing the family home, for them to scavenge for their fire.
  2. Am I related to Harold GASSON the railwayman and author – Harold GASSON wrote four (I think) books about his experiences on the Great Western Railway. There is no obvious family connection, but it would be nice to prove even a remote connection.
  3. Grandfather and the gate key – My grandfather paid the railway company for a key to open the railway crossing gate near the family home, but once the railway was closed, the tracks ripped up and the land sold to the local county council, the council still expected him to pay for the key, even though there was no need for a gate any more.

The first one should be quite easy to investigate, it is believed that “cousin” George was actually George Richardson (my grandfathers cousin), so I need to see if I can find any staff records and prove whether he did work on the railways and whether he came near the family home.

The second one is not so easy, there are some biographical details in Harold GASSON’s first book, which should allow me to start building his family tree, but I think I will have to go too far back to find a connection with my tree to make it a viable exercise.

The third one is most interesting to me. I know my grandfather corresponded with the county council, but I don’t know how the issue was resolved. I have a couple of letters and a copy of the original agreement with the railway company but I would really like to find out how the story ended, but I don’t know if the county council will have the documents that showed their side of the story.

Ulterior motives for researching the BATEMAN family

20 Jul

Last night I spent a couple of hours exploring my BATEMAN ancestors (I posted a photo of Henry BATEMAN last week), and I hadn’t really gone much further back than his parents William BATEMAN and Caroline JACKSON (my 3x great grandparents).

I did have an ulterior motive for investigating this ancestral line. I was looking at somewhere for a genealogy holiday next year! The BATEMANs were from Gloucestershire, William and Caroline lived in a place called Winchcombe (it was originally spelt without the ‘e’ on the end).

When I started Googling Winchcombe I soon realised that this was the ideal place for me to visit. Wikipedia told me that it sat on no less than six long distance footpaths, and that there was a heritage railway running through Winchcombe as well (I could ride around behind steam engines all week given half a chance). This sounded the perfect place for me already, but add on top of that a visit to the parish church to search for gravestones and visiting some ancestral homes, and I would be in my element.

What’s more my BATEMAN ancestors seem to have been playing ball last night, almost everything seemed to be working in my favour, they were pretty easy to find on the census (only one transcription error, BATAMAN not BATEMAN), they were easy to find in the GRO BMD Indexes and William and his siblings had their baptisms in the IGI.

Things went so well that I have not only added details for William and his siblings, but I also made a start on his parents (Thomas and Rebecca) from nearby Temple Guiting as well.

I need to check some other aspects, such as public transport and accommodation in the area, but expect to hear more about the BATEMANs in the next twelve months as I try and find out as much as possible in preparation for a holiday.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 113 other followers

%d bloggers like this: