Tag Archives: cross

North Downs Way: Guildford to Seale

5 Jun

We should have been in Kent today walking the next section of the North Downs Way, but given that it was also likely to be the hottest day of the year so far we thought it would be wise to find a route where we could finish early if things got too hot.

The section from Guildford to Farnham is either the start or end of the North Downs Way, and it is part of the route that we had so far not done, having started somewhere near the middle and heading east. So we decided we should walk part of this section, with the understanding that we probably wouldn’t complete the full 11 miles today. In the end we made as far as Seale, Surrey, which was about 7 miles.

To be honest this was a rather disappointing part of the North Downs Way, it didn’t feel like we were actually on the North Downs, there were no real hills to speak of, so there were virtually no interesting views to speak of, the best I could find was the one below, which shows how flat the landscape was.

Not much of a view

There were a few interesting sights along the way, one of the most bizarre was the huge wooden cross on a bridge near the village of Compton, Surrey. The bridge with the cross (actually crosses because there is one on the other side as well) carries the B3000 road. Apparently the crosses indicate that road passing beneath is part of the Pilgrim’s Way.

Cross on bridge

Another interesting thing about this walk is that for a large part of it the path was very sandy, in fact it was almost like walking on a beach (shame I didn’t pack a bucket and spade). I am not a geologist, but it appears to be natural, and we saw at least one sand pit nearby. It is not the only part of the route to have sandy paths, the paths leading up St Martha’s Hill to the east of Guildford were also thick with sand.

Sandy path

The village of Seale was quite pretty, but for us it marked the end of our walk, because there is a bus stop nearby on the A31 which would take us to Guildford (by way of Farnham, so we did get there in the end). The war memorial at Seale has one of the finest backdrops I have seen.

Seale war memorial

Picture Postcard Parade: Shoreham War Memorial Tablet

5 May

Yesterday I mentioned the chalk cross on the side of the hill above the village of Shoreham, Kent. I also mentioned it served as a war memorial, and that reminded me that I had a picture postcard in my collection of the memorial.

Shoreham War Memorial Tablet

There are no clues on the card as to who published it and when, but I am guessing it was a local photographer/publisher, and probably quite soon after the cross was created in 1920.

You won’t be able to read the inscription on the memorial and it is not very clear on the original, but I think it reads:

SHOREHAM
KENT

REMEMBER
AS YOU LOOK
AT
THE CROSS
ON THE HILL
THOSE
WHO GAVE
THEIR LIVES
FOR
THEIR COUNTRY
1914-1919

The Shoreham Cross

4 May

Saturday’s walk along another stretch of the North Downs has re-awakened another of my passions, a love of hill figures. Hill figures come in a variety of shapes (mostly horses), sizes, ages, material (mainly chalk) and are found mostly in Southern England (mainly in Wiltshire).

The starting point of our walk was Otford, which is just south of Shoreham, Kent. Shoreham is home to a hill figure, a chalk cross on the hillside. My first glimpse of the cross was from the train the week before, but it was only last week that I got chance to take the photo below, from Otford Mount.

Shoreham Cross

This hill figure is 100 feet high and 58 feet wide and was constructed in 1920. It serves as a war memorial to the men of Shoreham who lost their lives during the First and Second World Wars.

Shoreham Cross close-up

I wish we had more time to actually go and get a closer look at the cross, and the memorial stone. I am sure the chance will occur another time, and it looks like it is being well cared for and should be there for many years to come.

I know we will be passing several other Kent hill figures, and there are a couple of figures near the South Downs Way as well, so you can expect to see more hill figures on this blog in the future.

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