Tag Archives: ancestry.co.uk

My Family History Week: Sunday 27th May 2012

27 May

Family history activity has been a bit haphazard this week. Nothing really very focused, just poking about my family tree adding bits and pieces here and there.

National Probate Calendar on Ancestry.co.uk

I spent a while conducting some searches on the newly updated National Probate Calendar on Ancestry.co.uk but I soon realised that I probably ought to be a bit more methodical about it.

There are potentially hundreds of records in this collection that I ought to be looking for, but unless I actually make a point of being more methodical I am probably going to miss plenty of people along the way.

I am going to have to give some consideration to what is going to be the best way to achieve this.

Early Trowers in my family tree

I also spent a while looking at the information I have for some of the earliest (17th and 18th Century) Trowers in my family tree. I am conscious that I have lots of different bits of information floating about, mainly from wills.

I felt it was probably about time that I actually translated some of this “floating” information into some hard facts in my family tree or at least decide what further work is needed to be able to include this information.

Adding a pair of 7x great-grandparents

One off-shoot of this work on the early Trowers was that I was able to add another pair of 7x great-grandparents, Robert and Mary Greenfield of Henfield, Sussex whose daughter Ann married Henry Trower in 1747. This brings the total number of 7x great-grandparents in my family tree to eight individuals or four pairs.

Challenging times: Sorting out Patrick Vaughan’s information

As I suspected I never got around to doing anything about sorting out the information I have about Patrick Vaughan. I don’t want to let this slip but it has been several weeks since I said I was going to do this.

We have a long bank holiday weekend coming up soon and I am hoping that this will give me the opportunity to get back on track. Hopefully after this I can get on with setting myself with some new weekly challenges.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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Personal Research Update: Saturday 7th April 2012

7 Apr

I really need to find a more catchy name for these regular posts…

To be honest I haven’t done a great deal of family history this week, the main reason was because I spent some time planning a short-break (with a family history connection) for later in the year, on top of that the family history that I did do was not really what I had planned either.

As unlikely as it may seem the 1940 US census has also provided another distraction, not the actual census itself mind you, but the free 1940s-era collection on Ancestry.co.uk (750 million records from 139 different collections free until 11.59 BST on the 10th April 2012).

I am sure I am not alone in having the odd relative here and there that ended up in the US, in my case there are two that stand out, the Allcorns and the Eades (both connected through my Trower ancestors). So I took the opportunity to capture a few more images and bits of data, and will try to gather a few more bits and pieces before the offer runs out.

I already have a fair bit of data on these two families sitting in folders on my hard drive (some of this dating back to November 2007), but I haven’t really done anything about processing the information. I must get this information sorted and add some items to my to-do list for when opportunities like this spring up.

Talking of my to-do list, I haven’t really done any work on updating it this week, but I have done a little bit more work on processing the data from my visit to the East Sussex Record Office, but still have much to do on that front.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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One week and counting …

17 Feb

A week today sees the start of Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012 at Olympia, London, billed as “the biggest family history event in the world”.

For those that can’t make it to the event Ancestry.co.uk are giving you chance to watch some of their Ancestry Academy presentations online.

In what I believe is a first for WDYTYA Live, Ancestry.co.uk have announced that the following presentations will be streamed live over the internet:

Friday 24th February 2012

10:30-11:15 GMT – First steps: Build your family tree with censuses and birth, marriage and death records

13:30-14:45 GMT – Ancestry.co.uk revealed: the brand new features in the best-selling family history software [not sure about this one, it looks like they might have their timings a bit mixed up]

15:30-16:15 GMT – Before 1837: Discover the events that shaped your ancestors’ lives, and the records they left behind (presented by Tony Robinson)

Saturday 25th February 2012

11:00-11:45 GMT – Going further: Discover your ancestors all over the world with our global records

13:00-13:45 GMT – Parish records: Uncover the records for your area and trace your family all the way back to Tudor times

15:00-15:45 GMT – Getting started: Build your family tree with censuses and birth, marriage and death records

The only drawback (for people like me that have an aversion to social networking) is that they can only be accessed through their Facebook page by following the instructions on their blog.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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NEWS: Free access to Canadian Vital Records on Ancestry

16 Feb

Someone at Ancestry must be reading my blog and seeing my need for some Canadian records they have decided that they will open up access to their Canadian Birth, Marriage & Death Collections until the 20th February 2012 (more specifically until 11:59 p.m. (ET) on the 20th February). Either that or it has something to do with Family Day in Canada on the 20th.

The free access (registration required) covers some 28 million records across the following collections:

  • Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946
  • Bells Corners Cemetery (Richmond Road)
  • Births-deaths-marriages, Christian messenger
  • British Columbia, Canada, Birth Index, 1872-1903
  • British Columbia, Canada, Death Index, 1872-1990
  • British Columbia, Canada, Marriage Index, 1872-1935
  • Canada Obituary Collection
  • Canada Parliamentary Marriage and Divorces, 1867-1919
  • Crawford Cemetery, Dalhousie Township, Lanark County
  • Elmview Cemetery, Kars, Ontario, North Gower Township, lot 24, conc. 1
  • Kitchener, Ontario German War Graves
  • London Press (Ontario) Obituaries, 1998-99
  • Mariages de l’Enfant-Jesus de la Pointe-aux-Trembles, 1674-1975
  • Marriage Notices of Ontario 1813-1854
  • Nova Scotia, Canada, Births, 1836-1910
  • Nova Scotia, Canada, Deaths, 1864-1877, 1890-1960
  • Nova Scotia, Canada, Marriages, 1763-1935
  • Ontario Marriage Notices [1830-1856]
  • Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913
  • Ontario, Canada Marriage Registers by Clergy, 1896-1948
  • Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1801-1928
  • Ontario, Canada Obituaries, 1999-2001: Kitchener Record and Windsor Star
  • Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967
  • Ontario, Canada, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869
  • Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938 and Deaths Overseas, 1939-1947
  • Ontario, Canada: Civil Marriage Registrations, 1869-73
  • Ontario, Canada: Roman Catholic Marriages, 1827-1870
  • Ottawa, Canada, Beechwood Cemetery Registers, 1873-1990
  • Quebec, Genealogical Dictionary of Canadian Families (Tanguay Collection), 1608-1890
  • Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967
  • Répertoire des mariages de Sainte-Cécile-de-Masham, comté de Gatineau : 1853-1963
  • Répertoire des mariages du Lac-Sainte-Marie (Comté de Gatineau) : (1881-1963)
  • Repertoire des mariages, Sainte-Anne-de-la-Perade, 1684-1900
  • Riverside Cemetery Index, New Hambug, Ontario
  • Scottish-American Gravestones, 1700-1900
  • Sheldon Cemetery
  • St. James Anglican Church Cemetery, Hudson, Quebec, Vaudreuil County.
  • St. Paul’s United Church Cemetery (the old Methodist cemetery), Richmond, Ontario
  • St. Stephen’s Anglican Cemetery, Papineau County, Buckingham, Quebec
  • St. Thomas Anglican Church Cemetery, Stanley’s Corners (formerly Rathwell’s Corners)
  • The Denny Cemetery near Philipsville, Ontario
  • Toronto Star Obituaries, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1999 – April 2000, February 2001
  • Waterloo County, Ontario, Cemetery Inscriptions
  • Web: CanadianHeadstones.com Index, 1700-2010
  • Woodland Cemetery Records, Kitchener, Ontario
  • Zion Cemetery, Scarborough, York County, Ontario

What’s in it for me…

As you can see there is a definite shortage of Alberta records, which is where my attention is currently focused. However, I shall be taking full advantage of this free access to search for Patrick and Kate Vaughan and their children, as there is no guarantee that they remained in Alberta. Also there are one or two other relations scattered in my family tree that ended up in Canada that I haven’t really looked into, including Kate’s brother Asher.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
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What’s in it for me: Register of Duties Paid for Apprentices’ Indentures

25 Aug

Ancestry.co.uk have added to their collection of occupational records with the release of a collection entitled UK, Register of Duties Paid for Apprentices’ Indentures 1710-1811. The records which make up this collection are from The National Archives (series IR1) and whilst various indexes to these records have been available online previously I believe this is the first time that they have been fully indexed along with images of the registers.

According to the Ancestry website:

This collection contains registers of the money received for the payment on taxes for an apprentice’s indenture between 1710-1811. The registers kept track of the money paid by masters of a trade to have an apprentice. The dates in the records are for when the tax was paid and may be some years after the apprenticeship, not when it started or finished.

The information in each record does differ from across the collection, so earlier records may name the apprentice’s father the later ones don’t. Along with the name of the apprentice you should find the name of the master, their occupation, their location, the length of the apprenticeship, the amount the master was paid and the amount of duty that they had to pay.

One thing that is particularly confusing is the layout of the records, both on Ancestry and in the original registers. On Ancestry each record is covered by two images (or it is on the ones I have looked at) clicking a search result will take you to the first page and then you need to click to the next image to view more details. With the original registers  there doesn’t appear to be any headings to the different columns (although I am not sure if this is the same throughout the collection), presumably there is a header at the start of each register, but it takes a bit of work to interpret each record.

For more background on apprenticeship records see The National Archives research guide covering the subject.

So what’s in it for me…

Some initial searches have turned up a few records of interest, however I am sure over time more will emerge. This is one of those collections that will need to be checked again and again, although the lack of detail in some of those records may well make it difficult to identify whether you have the correct individual or not.

One particularly interesting record is for Henry TROWER who was apprenticed to Charles WARD of Henfield, Sussex a carpenter and joiner for 6 years. For this Charles WARD was paid £10, for which he had to pay five shillings duty. This was paid on the 17th June 1766 which means this might be my 5x great-grandfather who was born in 1750.

My Henry TROWER does seem to be the most likely fit given the date but without any more detail it is not possible to say for certain whether this is my ancestor or not.

Copyright © 2011 John Gasson.
Creative Commons Licence This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
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