Madness Monday: learning about lunacy whilst waiting to move on

11 May

So far I had uncovered just about everything I could about George Thomas GASSON whilst he was at the Sussex County Asylum, Haywards Heath, Sussex. Now it was time to turn my attention to Hellingly Asylum, where George Thomas had been transferred in October 1903.

I knew this wasn’t going to be straight forward. From my early enquiries at the East Sussex Record Office I knew that I would need to obtain written permission to view these later records as they were still closed. So I prepared a letter and put it in the post.

From that stage forward I tried to forget about, I didn’t think anything would happen quickly and I wondered if it would even find the right person, and even if it did they might not agree to allow me access. I tried not to think about and got on with my research.

I still had plenty to do, notes to write up, other sources to check and also I wanted to find out more background information about both of the asylums and the treatment of mental illness in general at that time.

Fortunately the Internet Archive came to my rescue, with a copy of A Dictionary of Psychological Medicine edited by D. Hack Tuke, M.D., LL.D., published in 1892 in two volumes. In it I was able to find a definition of the term mania, “Insanity characterised in its full development by mental exhaltation and bodily excitement. The term is also sometimes used for acute mania. Popularly it is used for the delusions of the insane.”

It also gave me a introduction into The Lunacy Act, 1890 (under the heading LAW OF LUNACY, 1890 and 1891). This was the legislation under which George Thomas was being treated, with examples of some of the different types forms that were being used at the time, some of which I had already looked at. It went some way to helping me understand what was going on when George Thomas was being admitted to the asylum.

In general however, I have found very little information about asylums and the treatment of mental illness, other than some publications about specific asylums. There is also a real lack of information about researching lunatics for family historians, it has been a real uphill struggle trying to understand what was going on, and where to go next.

Perhaps one day I will put together a guide for family historians based on my own experiences, but until then if you have any questions let me know and I will try and help.

About these ads

One Response to “Madness Monday: learning about lunacy whilst waiting to move on”

  1. peter leonard May 18, 2012 at 8:12 am #

    I’m also interested in researching my great great great great grandfather, John Walton, a Confectioner from Islington who died in Friern Barnet Lunatic Asylum (also known as Colney Hatch in 1860 – Fortunately I have found his Doctors medical register at the National Archives with his entry.
    Peter

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 113 other followers

%d bloggers like this: