Tag Archives: victoria

Australia Day 2011: The marriage certificate of William Joseph Henry BATEMAN and a mystery solved

26 Jan

To celebrate Australia Day Shelley from the Twigs of Yore blog has issued a challenge to write about an Australian ancestor or relative, you can read the full details here.

As I have no Australian ancestors and to my knowledge only one of my direct ancestors ever set foot on Australian soil (and that was only for about week in the 1920s), it meant that my earliest relation with an Australian connection was William Joseph Henry BATEMAN (my 2x great-uncle). I have already written much about his life and my research, but I haven’t really discussed the earliest record I have for him in Australia, which would be his marriage certificate from the 22nd April 1905.

It took me a while to find this record, I knew that William had ended up in Australia (having been born in Brighton, Sussex, England in 1882) and had a family there, but had not been able to find a record of him actually travelling to Australia and didn’t even know when he had arrived in Australia, except if was after 1891 because he was still at home in the census that year. The marriage certificate not only gave me details of his wife and the marriage itself, but also solved the mystery of his arrival in Australia.

I downloaded the certificate from The Victorian Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages website, having used the Electoral Rolls on Ancestry.com.au to narrow down the state and discover his wife’s christian name. I must admit I found the process of searching for the marriage to be somewhat awkward and clunky, and the end result was rather disappointing as the quality of the downloaded image left a lot to be desired, but at least I had a copy.

Eventually I was able to work out all the details (and there was more detail than on an English marriage certificate), confirm that this was the right man and solve the mystery of his arrival in Australia. His occupation was seaman and his residence was H.M.S. Katoomba, a Royal Navy vessel. His naval record confirmed that William had served in the navy and when his service came to an end he was in Australia. No wonder I couldn’t find him on any passenger lists.

But back to the marriage itself. It took place in Geelong, Victoria at the Parsonage, in Yarra Street. The ceremony was conducted by William Williams a Methodist Minister according to the rites of the Methodist Church. At the time of their marriage William was a 23 year old bachelor and his wife Annie Clark BALL was a 24 year old widow with one child from her previous marriage, living in Moorabool Street, Geelong.

Although the certificate was not much to look at it did this solve one mystery and provided plenty of avenues for future research (most of which I haven’t pursued yet) in their married life, Annie’s previous marriage and William’s naval service. Perhaps one day I get to visit Australia and will find myself wandering around the streets of Geelong.

Souvenir of Bendigo

30 Sep

As a follow-on from my Postcards from Australia series of posts, this is another treasure that was sent from Australia by the BATEMANs back to England.

The envelope above probably (I can’t be 100% certain) contained the three photographs below, which are views from the town of Bendigo, Victoria, Australia.

From left to right they are:

  • Soldiers’ Memorial Hall, Bendigo.
  • St. Paul’s Cathedral, Bendigo.
  • The Boathouse, Lake Weerona, Bendigo.

I know this because someone has helpfully written the locations on the back. The handwriting looks the same as that on the envelope so I guess it was either Annie or William BATEMAN.

These were sent quite a bit later than the postcards I have previously featured, the postmark on the envelope looks like 25 FEB 29, and I believe the monarch on the stamp is George V, so this would fit in with a date of 1929.

The other difference is the recipient, these were sent to my grandmother Dorothy Annie TROWER who would have been 16 years old at the time. Dorothy Annie was the daughter of Henry John and Dorothy May TROWER, making her William Joseph Henry BATEMAN’s neice.

Three seems an odd number of photos to include, so I wonder if there were originally more. If anyone knows then please get in touch.

Postcards from Australia: Away in the land of the Wattle and Gum

22 Sep

This is the last of my “Postcards from Australia” posts for a while, although there are a couple of other souvenirs I will be featuring in the coming weeks. This card was sent by William Joseph Henry BATEMAN (of Port Melbourne, Victoria) to his sister (Dorothy) May BATEMAN in Sussex, England.

Away in the land of the Wattle and Gum

The picture is not particularly appealing to me, but it is a good example of cramming in almost every Australian stereotype you can imagine into one image, and it has the added novelty of a metal kangaroo attached to the front (if you look at the back you can see where the fastenings are).

The gold print didn’t scan very well, so you can’t read the writing on the leaf in the top-left corner, but it says:

“Good Cheer!” It comes from the Sunny South,
And is wafted far over the sea;
And it tells you that, under the Southern Cross,
Someone is thinking of thee.

As with some of the previous “Postcards from Australia” the message on the back is probably more interesting than the picture on front.

Away in the land of the Wattle and Gum (back)

The message is dated the 7th May, but no year is given. The message is a little hard to read, and is short on punctuation, but it is basically wishing May a happy birthday and hoping everyone is well.

Just a few lines hoping you are quite well as I am pleased to say we are all pretty well over here at present and to Wish you many happy returns of the day. I am sorry we are a bit late but better late than never I hope you are still getting on nicely at your place. I suppose it will not have you much longer I hope Mum & Dad are both doing well and are in the best of health Annie myself and Children are all pretty well and are still jogging along I suppose you are having some nice weather now. I also hope the intended is in the best of health I suppose mother received Annies letter last week, so Good Bye, Love to all at home “Will”

There are a couple of dating clues in the message, if you know where to look. “Will” supposes her place “will not have you much longer” and enquires about the health of her intended. I assume this means that the message was written not long before May was due to be married, and would probably be leaving her place (where she worked) and moving in with her husband.

(Dorothy) May BATEMAN (my great-grandmother) married Henry John TROWER (my great-grandfather) on the 5th August 1911 at Christ Church, Sayers Common, Sussex, so that probably means that this card was sent earlier that year.

Postcards from Australia: Luck At Last

2 Sep

Here is another of the postcards sent by William Joseph Henry BATEMAN and his family from Australia back to his parents in England. This one was written to William’s mother Dorothy Isabella BATEMAN on the 26th September 1907 by his wife Annie.

Luck at Last

Once again I know nothing about the publisher or the artist, but like the other ones I have written about, I do like the image. I also love the way that so much information was crammed onto the back of the card, not even space for a stamp on this one.

Luck at Last (reverse)

These messages give a wonderful insight into their life in Australia, and an insight into Annie’s personality, she has a wonderful style of writing and a subtle sense of humour (and a dislike of punctuation).

The main message reads “Just a line to let you know we are all in the best of health and that we have moved again you will think it must be cheaper to shift than pay rent but we have a much better house and 1/6 a week cheaper and there was only a fence between us and the land-lady and she was a fair old tander but only one street away from where we were our address now is :- Esplanade Place Port Melb’e no number but but [sic] there are only five houses in the street. hope all are well Will has gone back to work”

The two shorter messages are just as interesting, “I am going over to Geelong tomorrow for three days I have to go down to draw the interest on Siddies’ money. I am taking the two children with me”. This is referring to Annie’s son from her first marriage, Sidney Ambrose BULL, presumably there was some sort of legacy left by his late father that interest was being paid on.

The second even shorter message, “baby is not walking yet I think he feels safer on the the floor.” is referring to William Thomas Henry BATEMAN, Annie and William’s first child who would have been a few days away from his first birthday when this card was sent.

There is one word that puzzles me, tander, I presume this is an Australian slang word, but have been unable to find a definition for it. From the context of the message I have taken it to mean someone who is an interfering busy-body, but perhaps someone more knowledgeable would like to provide me with a more accurate definition.

Australian Relations: What happened to the children of William Joseph Henry BATEMAN?

6 Aug

This is really where the trail starts to go cold. Limited access and privacy restrictions mean that details are thin on the ground, but that doesn’t mean I have given up hope of finding living relations in Australia.

Basically what I have discovered is that all three children of William Joseph Henry and Annie Clark BATEMAN were married, the two sons appear to have remained in the state of Victoria whilst the daughter and her husband moved to New South Wales.

  • Reginald Graham BATEMAN married Kathleen Frances HORBY in Victoria in 1933
  • Dorothy Marguerite BATEMAN married Leslie Herbert MARSHALL in Victoria in 1934
  • William Thomas Henry BATEMAN married Irene Elizabeth MCNAMARA in Victoria in 1940

So far I have only found evidence of one child from these three marriages, but I suspect that it is more to do with availability of records rather than the fact that there weren’t any more.

Dorothy Marguerite and her husband Leslie Herbert MARSHALL had a son named Alan Leslie MARSHALL on the 22nd January 1950. They were living in Crown Street, Sydney, New South Wales at the time and the birth was announced in The Sydney Morning Herald.

Australian Relations: The children of William Joseph Henry BATEMAN

5 Aug

This is another instalment in my ongoing series of articles on the life of William Joseph Henry BATEMAN and his family from Australia. This is an ongoing research project and if you can provide further information then please get in touch.

William Joseph Henry (WJH) BATEMAN and his wife Annie Clark BULL (nee MCCONACHY) were married on the 22nd April 1905 in Geelong, Victoria, Australia. So far I have only found details for three children, certainly only three appear to have survived into adulthood, and I have found no evidence to suggest that there were any other children.

William Thomas Henry BATEMAN (born 1906)

Their first child was a son, William Thomas Henry BATEMAN. According to his entry on the WW2 nominal roll, he was born on the 1st October 1906 in Melbourne, Australia. More specifically his birth registration index entry states that he was born in Carlton, Victoria.

His names all appear to be family names, but of course I can’t say for certain if this is the reason for the choice or whether it is just a coincidence.

William from his father William Joseph Henry BATEMAN
Thomas from his maternal grandfather Thomas MCCONACHY
Henry from his paternal grandfather Henry BATEMAN

Dorothy Marguerite BATEMAN (born 1909)

WJH and Annie’s next child was a daughter, Dorothy Marguerite BATEMAN, born in 1909. Her birth registration index entry gives her place of birth as Port Melbourne, Victoria.

The name Dorothy probably comes from WJH’s mother Dorothy Isabella BATEMAN (nee KINGHORN), but I have no idea where the name Marguerite comes from.

Reginald Graham BATEMAN (born c1913)

The third child was another son, Reginald Graham BATEMAN who was born around 1913. I don’t have his exact date or year of birth because the online indexes don’t cover 1913 yet. The information I have comes from the fact that Reginald was 56 years old when he died in 1969.

Interestingly Reginald was the name of Annie’s first husband, but it is hard to believe that she would have named a son after her dead husband. The name Graham was the surname of WJH’s maternal grandmother, but possibly both connections are coincidences.

Australian Relations: William Joseph Henry BATEMAN (The Marriage: 1905)

30 Jul

This is the third in a series of articles about William Joseph Henry BATEMAN and his family from Australia. This is an ongoing research project and so far much of the research is based on index entries and is unverified, if you have more information or corrections then please get in touch.

On the 22nd April 1905 William Joseph Henry (WJH) BATEMAN (aged 23) married Annie Clark BULL (aged 24). The ceremony took place at the Parsonage, Yarra Street, Geelong, Victoria, Australia and was performed by William Williams, a Methodist Minister.

The digital copy of the marriage registration is not very clear and slightly tricky to read, but for someone used to English marriage certificates it potentially provides much more detail. Instead of just a father’s name, it also includes the mother’s maiden name. It also gives place of birth for the bride and groom and their present residence and their usual residence.

WJH is shown as a seaman, living on the HMS Katoomba, Annie’s residence is not easy to make out except that it was in Geelong, neither is her place of birth, somewhere in Victoria but that is all I can work out.

WJH’s parents are correctly shown as Henry BATEMAN and Dorothy KINGHORN, and Henry’s profession is given as coachman, which agrees with other sources. Annie’s parents are Thomas MCCONACHY (a restaurant keeper) and Elizabeth STEEL. This suggests that at the relatively young age of 24 years Annie was already a widow.

This is confirmed in the condition column, which also tells us that her previous husband died in 1900 and that she had one child surviving from that marriage.

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