Tag Archives: sussex day

Spare a thought for Sussex Day

1 Jun

As Britain gears itself up for the long Diamond Jubilee weekend please spare a thought for Sussex Day.

Saturday 16th June 2012 is Sussex Day, a day to celebrate everything that is great about Sussex. You can find out more about Sussex Day on the West Sussex County Council website.

Hopefully because Sussex Day falls on a weekend this year there will be more events celebrating Sussex than previous years, although I have found a few events on the 16th June this year. It has quite clearly not made it as a major feature of the calendar yet. Don’t expect it to be celebrated by a Google Doodle any time soon.

This week has seen a steady increase in the amount of bunting and number of Union Flags that have taken hold on all manner of public and private buildings. It is great to see the country getting in the spirit of the occasion, if only some of that spirit could be bottled and kept safely for the 16th.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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Time to think about Sussex Day 2011

23 May

Sussex Day 2011 is fast approaching and like the last two years I want to celebrate the 16th June in some special way. The previous years this has involved spending the day walking and visiting ancestral locations.

Unfortunately this year I will not be able to get the day off work (the 16th June is a Thursday this year), so my options are going to be rather limited in terms of walking. I still hope to be able to spend at least part of the day walking. I should be able to get three or four hours walking in after work so I will be looking for a walking route home that is a little different to my usually walking route.

With limited options for walking I will have to divert my energies to researching and writing about Sussex and my Sussex ancestors. I know I normally write quite a bit about Sussex already but I am thinking of a having a week-long celebration of all things Sussex.

If I am going to do that then I need to start planning, researching and writing now. I won’t have much opportunity to get out and do much new research between now and Sussex Day, but I have plenty of material already at hand that needs writing up, so that shouldn’t be a problem.

For the first time in a few weeks I am starting to get excited at the prospect of have something special to write about. Even if I can’t get out for a decent walk on Sussex Day I will find other ways to celebrate the day.

Copyright © 2011 John Gasson.
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Sussex Day 2010 is nearly here

4 Jun

The 16th June is Sussex Day, an excuse to celebrate everything and anything to do with the county of Sussex.

There are a few events organised to mark the occasion, but never being one to follow the crowd I shall probably do my own thing, probably involving walking and family history.

Last year I ended up walking 20 miles through the Sussex countryside visiting several ancestral villages, houses and churches along the way, before ending up on top of Wolstonbury Hill, overlooking the landscape where my ancestors lived.

Until now I haven’t really given much thought to what I will do to mark Sussex Day this year, but weather permitting I shall probably do something similar, but maybe not quite so far this time around.

Happy St. George’s Day 2010

23 Apr

Happy St. George’s Day to all my readers, and that is about the limit as far as my celebrations of St. George’s Day will stretch. As I said last year, there is not really any great outpouring of patriotism surrounding the Patron Saint of England.

Perhaps it is because of this that I have struggled to find any historic postcards that celebrate St. George’s Day. I am sure there must be some with depictions of St. George but I haven’t found any. Instead I present you with a postcard of a church dedicated to him.

St. George's Church, Hurstpierpoint, Sussex

This is St. George’s Church in Hurstpierpoint, Sussex. I am not aware of any direct family link with this church, although there were several of my ancestors living nearby. This postcard was published by A.H. Homewood from nearby Burgess Hill, probably around 1905.

Personally, this card reminds me of my Sussex Day (16th June) walk last year when I visited Hurstpierpoint and passed by St. George’s Church.

St Georges Church, Hurstpierpoint

Sadly the church is not in use any more, or at least it wasn’t last year and I don’t expect the situation has changed since. I am sure that in the future a new use for it will emerge, at least it is now a Grade II listed building so it should receive some protection in the future.

Sussex Day 2009: Part 10 – Wolstonbury Hill to Hassocks

26 Jun

Having reached the top of Wolstonbury Hill the rest of my Sussex Day walk could only be downhill.

I considered the best way home, I could go west and down to Newtimber and Poynings and catch the bus. However that would have meant crossing the busy A23 which I wasn’t keen to do.

So instead I headed east, a path lead south a short way from the top of the hill and joined an east-west path which slowly descended towards Clayton. About half a mile along the path, another path lead north, into some shade and continued downhill and eventually out onto New Way Lane.

About a quarter of a mile east was the village of Clayton, there were only two things I knew about Clayton, the railway tunnel and the twin windmills of Jack and Jill. I discovered there was also a lovely little church with some quite stunning wall paintings, and a splendid graveyard with wonderful views of the South Downs, in fact it was almost on the Downs.

A path lead north from Clayton along the side of the railway line for about a mile, straight to Hassocks railway station, not surprising really considering it was following the railway line. It was just after four o’clock when I arrived at Hassocks railway station, just enough time to visit the local newsagents to buy some more drink, before catching a train to Brighton and a bus home.

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