Tag Archives: radio 4

Picture Postcard Parade: On Beachy Head

27 May

What better way to spend the coming bank holiday than a visit to Beachy Head, near Eastbourne, East Sussex? Well it will probably be raining this year so it might not be so good this year, but people have been visiting Beachy Head for pleasure for decades.

On Beachy Head

I’ve no idea if this was a bank holiday, or what time of year this photo was taken, but there are certainly plenty of people exploring the cliff top and enjoying the views, more so then I was there recently.

The people on this card are perhaps a little close to the edge, they are certainly closer than I got on my recent visit. Nothing spoils a good walk more than falling off a cliff or the cliff falling away from beneath your feet!

This card was published by Valentines, and although the postcard has been used, the bottom half of the date is missing, so I can’t see when it was posted, but I would imagine it dates from around 1910.

Coincidently the first episode of the latest series of Ramblings on BBC Radio 4 features Clare Balding exploring Beachy Head with a group of disabled ramblers. The episode is currently available on the BBC iPlayer.

Running out of steam

6 Apr

I don’t know how it happened. Yesterday I barely touched my family history and this evening I haven’t even opened my copy of Family Historian or my family history folders.

Am I suffering from genealogy burn out?

Last night I found myself idly flicking through my files, clicking on individuals in Family Historian, almost at random. I could see plenty of work to be done, and I did add a few details, but I just couldn’t summon up the enthusiasm to actually do any serious work. Even the GEERING family have lost their appeal.

Tonight was even worse, I didn’t even make the effort to do any research. Now I am starting to feel guilty, perhaps I should stay up late and force myself to do some research or some organising, but it is getting late and I should be going to bed.

It wasn’t that there was anything else that was more interesting to divert my attention today (it’s only an election after all!). I did listen to an interesting programme on BBC Radio 4, Between Ourselves which was about the life and work of two Coroners, which in a way was family history related, although in a modern context.

I don’t think I could live with myself if I didn’t do some research tomorrow, so I think I will have to chain myself to the computer and force myself to climb back up my tree and start swinging through the branches until someone catches my eye. Hang on, I think I can hear my ancestors calling now…

BBC Radio 4 – Tracing Your Roots (Myths and Truths)

9 Sep

The latest edition of Tracing Your Roots from BBC Radio 4 (available via podcast for a limited time) was about family myths and legends. There were four very brief examples, with a short discussion on how each of the stories could be proved or disproved.

This got me thinking about my own family myths and legends and the fact that I don’t appear to have any in my family tree.

I have tried to remember if I was ever told any stories as a child or whether there was anything I wanted to try and prove when I started my research, but I don’t think there ever was. No criminals amongst my ancestors, no stories of relations moving to far off lands and making their fortune, no missing millions waiting to be discovered and I didn’t think I might have been descended from the illegitimate child of some distant King or Queen.

Plenty of mysteries and puzzles have turned up since I started researching, like why did my grandfather end up at school in London, but nothing actually from the start that I wanted to prove or made me start researching my family tree.

I suppose there is only one myth that I had and that was one that I created soon after I started researching. I rather foolishly believed that my ancestors and relations were not very interesting and never did anything unusual. How wrong could I be!

Was there a particular family story that you wanted to prove that got you started in family history research, or was it just general curiosity?

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