Tag Archives: podcasts

Two great podcasts today

29 May

Whilst sorting through the files and folders on my hard drive today I listened to two new podcast episodes. I must admit that I am rather biased about these two podcasts, because they are both subjects close to my heart.

First was the next episode of the BBC Radio 4 programme Ramblings, in which Clare Balding walked part of the South Downs Way from Ditchling Beacon to Devil’s Dyke. It was wonderful to hear her talking about some of the places that I had seen on my walk last week, and some of the things I had mentioned on my blog post.

Next up was the latest podcast from The National Archives, this was a talk entitled Lost London Pubs given by Jack Adams at the Pub History Society Conference I attended back in February and wrote about here. It was great to hear the talk again and I hope that some of the other talks will appear over the next few weeks.

It is very rare to get a podcast that is so close to home, relevant and interesting, but to get two come along at the same time is unheard of, but nevertheless welcome.

Some background listening for chasing criminals

4 Aug

If the recent release of the Criminal Registers 1791-1892 on Ancestry.co.uk has inspired you to start chasing after a criminal in your own family tree then you might be interested in some of the podcasts produced by The National Archives on the subjects of criminals and prisons.

These podcasts are recordings of talks given at The National Archives in Kew, and cover a varied range of subjects and historical periods (right up to only a few decades ago). Usually, but not always, the talk has some connection to the holdings of The National Archives. The show notes for each podcast contain a varying degree of background material, all have a brief description of the talk, but some also include illustrations and a transcript of the talk.

Those relevant to the subject of criminals and prisons include:

Victorian Women Prisoners by Chris Heather (published 9th October 2008)

The real Little Dorrit: Charles Dickens and the debtors’ prison by David Thomas (published 28th November 2008)

Catching Victorian and Edwardian criminals on paper by Professor Barry Godfrey and Doctor David Cox (published 8th May 2009)

Prison: five hundred years behind bars by Edward Marston (published 22nd May 2009)

If you watched last week’s episode of Who Do You Think You Are? with Kate Humble then you might also want to have a listen to the podcast about The Great Escape, which tells the real story behind the events that inspired the film.

Doing the ironing with my mp3 player

2 Aug

On a Sunday afternoon you will often find me in the kitchen with an iron in one hand, a pile of washing on the table and a pair of earphones in my ears. To make the task of ironing more bearable I will usually be listening to podcasts, and usually they will be family history related. Today was no exception, so here is my “playlist” for today:

Family History Podcast: Episode 8 – News, clues and street views

Things have been a bit quiet over at the Family History Podcast in recent months, but I am pleased to say that Will Howells has just put up a new episode. There are only a few episodes in the archive so far, but they are well worth a listen (and watch in the case of the video episodes) if you have an interest in UK family history.

British Postal Museum and Archives Podcast: Tony Benn – Girobank: The 40th Anniversary of The People’s Bank

This is a new venture from the British Postal Museum and Archive, and their first podcast features Tony Benn talking about the establishment of the National Girobank (amongst other things). It was recorded on the 16th October 2008, and will probably be of more interest to social historians than genealogists. It is a very entertaining and informative talk, although sadly the questions at the end are a little tricky to hear.

Neil Innes: Works in Progress

As I still had a couple of shirts to go and had run out of podcasts, I switched over to music and started listening to Neil Innes’ most recent album Works in Progress. I have long been a fan of Neil Innes, and have seen him live several times. As well as fantastic music, it has some great lyrics as well, an example of which from the track “One of Those People” is “The last thing I need is a feeling of guilt, when I’m wading through treacle on balsa wood stilts”. It never fails to make me smile, likewise from “Eye Candy”, “At the ambassador’s reception I had to get away, so I hid behind a pyramid of Ferrero Roche”.

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