Tag Archives: marx

Have I discovered Mary TROWER’s secret?

16 Jan

I wasn’t really sure why I ordered the marriage certificate for Emanuel MARX and Mary TROWER. In truth I didn’t really need to order it, but I am glad that I did.

I was certain that this was the marriage of my 3x great-aunt, but the information that Mary’s father was Henry TROWER and he was a farmer confirmed this.

For the record, Mary TROWER married Emanuel MARX on the 14th August 1884 at the Register Office in Pancras Registration District.

I was interested to find out more about the groom, according to the certificate his occupation was interpreter and was living at 183 Albany Street in London. His father was Bernard MARX and he was a clothier.

By the 1891 census Emanuel was described as a commercial traveller and he and Mary were living at 2 Priory Road, Hampstead, London.

Most interesting however were the details for Mary. No occupation was given, which is not that unusual, and her residence was given as H.M. Prison Kingston.

So Mary was living in a prison, which begs the question was she an inmate or did she work there? In the 1881 census Mary had been working in an asylum so it is possible she may have switched from one institution to another as a member of staff rather than as an inmate.

Another interesting research challenge to follow up. I seem to be gathering a few criminal connections, I am really going to have to spend some time studying criminal and prison records.

Another 3x great-aunt with some missing years

11 Jan

Three daughters of my 3x great-grandparents Henry and Jane TROWER of Henfield, Sussex have been causing me some concern. In truth I had forgotten about my problems with them, except for Mercy TROWER, until I started searching in the 1911 census.

Fortunately the disappearance of Mary TROWER has been more or less solved now, with the discovery of her marriage to Emanuel MARX. Mercy is still a bit of a puzzle, but I am hoping to resolve that in the very near future.

The other daughter that has given me some problems is Jane. Jane TROWER was born in 1862, apparently in Henfield. I have entries for her in the 1871 and 1881 census, but then she disappears (or at least I can’t find any trace of her) until her death, somewhere in the Horsham Registration District in 1922.

She actually died on the 16th December 1922, or at least that is the date recorded on her gravestone in Henfield Cemetery. It stands next to that of her parent’s Henry and Jane, so I am certain that it is the correct one.

So it doesn’t look like she married, so that is not the reason why I can’t find her in the 1891, 1901 and now the 1911 census. Interestingly I didn’t find an entry for Jane TROWER in the Henfield burial records, so perhaps she was buried under another name, I am going to have to double check that, make sure there was no other Jane buried around that time.

To be honest I had forgotten about Jane, I had a start and end to her life and that seemed enough, but it is now bugging me that I don’t know what happened in the middle. My brain has already started try and fill in the gap.

Did she marry and then divorce? Did no-one know her married name? Did the stone mason make a mistake? Did she leave the country and only come back later in life? Did she spend time in prison, or an asylum (it is Madness Monday after all)?

It looks like the only source left to turn to is her death certificate, I think once I have resolved my problems with Mercy TROWER I will move on to her sister and order a copy of her death certificate to examine for clues.

My to-do list goes out the window

5 Jan

Well it hasn’t quite yet, but I did get rather distracted yesterday and almost completely forgot about what I was supposed to be doing. It was inevitable that something more interesting would come up, and it did.

I decided to make a late Christmas present to myself of a six month subscription to the 1911 census on findmypast.co.uk. I knew I had plenty of relations (and a few ancestors) to find, but wasn’t really expecting to find anything out of the ordinary.

A couple of interesting things turned up which I wasn’t expecting, like the fact that Thomas DRIVER my 2x great-grandfather re-married after the death of his first wife. His first wife Ellen VINALL died in 1899 and he married Harriett DEACON in 1908, something that I probably wouldn’t have found out otherwise.

The biggest surprise of all was the re-appearance of my 3x great-aunt Mary TROWER. She is the only one of the thirteen children of Henry and Jane TROWER (my 3x great-grandparents) of Henfield, Sussex, who I had not been able to “kill off”.

She had fallen of the radar after the 1881 census, where she had been working as a nurse at Colney Hatch Lunatic Asylum. I had no idea what she did after that, did she marry? Did she have any children? Did she leave the country? When did she die?

Now I know a bit more. She turned up in 1911 at her brother-in-law and sister’s (James and Martha SUMMERFIELD) house in Newdigate, Surrey. She was a widow and her married name was MARX (once again I am blessed with an uncommon surname).

It didn’t take long to find her marriage in 1884 to Emanuel MARX. According to the 1891 census he was a commercial traveller from Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Emanuel died at the end of 1891, and by the 1901 census Mary is on her own down at Brighton, Sussex. Everything suggests there weren’t any children.

As the couple were married in Pancras Registration District I expected to find them in the London Parish Registers at Ancestry.co.uk, but they are nowhere to be found. I suspect this means it wasn’t a Church of England marriage, the easiest way to find out will be to order a copy of the marriage certificate.

So at last I know when Mary died as well. Her death was registered in Reigate Registration District in Q3 1918, but I am not sure if she would still have been with the SUMMERFIELD family at the time. It would be interesting to get her death certificate to see where exactly she was and perhaps locate her place of burial.

I am glad I bought that subscription to the 1911 census, it has answered a long standing question, which I had actually forgotten about, so it was well worth the money on that count alone.

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