Tag Archives: marriage

The marriage certificate of Thomas NICHOLLS and Martha DRAPPER

1 Apr

The marriage certificate of Thomas NICHOLLS and Martha DRAPPER arrived last Saturday whilst I was enjoying myself at Haywards Heath and to be honest I was a little disappointed by the result.

Most of what I knew was correct, the date was the 21st March 1840 not the 15th as I had expected, but that was really the important bit.  The important information was the name of the bride and groom’s fathers.

From the census I already knew Martha’s father was George DRAPPER (the certificate confirmed this) but it was Thomas’ father I was most interested in. He was named as James NICHOLLS, a labourer. This was a bit of a set back because I was hoping it was going to be Joshua. I had found a very likely looking baptism for Thomas (and several other siblings) in Blean, Kent but his parents were Joshua and Mary NICHOLLS.

Of course it is always possible that the marriage certificate was wrong, possible but unlikely. Unfortunately this little project is not working out quite as nicely as I had hoped.

I really need to find out a more exact birth date for Thomas. All I have at the moment is the 1841 census where he is recorded as 20 years old, but this may or may not have been rounded down correctly. The marriage certificate just gives both bride and groom as being of full age.

The next step is to investigate Thomas’ death, to pinpoint the date of his death and how old he was when he died and if I am “lucky” there might also be an interesting cause of death to follow-up.

‘C’ is for Confusion in Carlisle

1 Sep

I went to bed last night (slightly later than I had hoped) feeling very pleased with myself, I had managed to clear a name off my list of unidentified wives. Every time I opened up my family history software (Family Historian) the alphabetical list of names begins with a section of seventeen women whose surname is unknown, and it has been bugging me that I haven’t found out who they are.

I hadn’t really set out to try and clear any of them last night, I didn’t really know what I was going to work on, but I ended up picking the first name off the top of the list and looking again at trying to find out who she was. The first name on the list was Alice, the first wife of George KINGHORN the son of Thomas KINGHORN the mail guard (my 4x great-grandfather).

I think George is probably the only one of Thomas’ children to remain in Carlisle, Cumberland, the rest appear to have moved down to London. The marriage of George KINGHORN and Alice should have taken place in Carlisle, the other end of the country from me, which explains why I hadn’t got around to identifying her yet.

Having reviewed the data and available online databases I found that there was still not much chance of finding her maiden name, George KINGHORN is in FreeBMD, marrying in Q1 1840 in Carlisle Registration District, but none of the spouses on the same page are named Alice. The most likely scenarios seemed to be that this was another George KINGHORN and that my George married prior to the start of civil registration in 1837, or that Alice wasn’t her real name but a nickname.

With nothing better to do I thought I would work forward and fill in some more detail on the family. It appeared I didn’t have an entry for the family in the 1851 census, but this turned out to be incorrect. I had entries for everyone except George and Alice’s daughter Sarah KINGHORN, so I decided to go in search of her. It was then that things started slotting into place.

She was living in Wetheral, Cumberland, with her uncle Thomas CARR and his mother Sarah CARR. Could Thomas be the brother of Alice? Both Thomas and Alice CARR were baptised in Carlisle, the children of Thomas and Sarah CARR (according to the IGI). Things were looking promising. Even Alice’s age was about right, this had to be her, but when did she get married and why was she not showing up as marrying George KINGHORN.

Searching FreeBMD for Alice’s marriage brought up the same details as George, Q1 1840 and Carlisle Registration District, so why hadn’t I found her before? Looking closer I noticed she was listed as being on page 25C of the register whereas George was on page 25 (both were in volume 25).

Something is not quite right with the index, there are eight people listed on page 25 and only one on page 25c, I don’t know what that extra C means, but it does mean that there is an odd number of people getting married in Carlisle that quarter.

It also means that there is still an element of doubt in my mind, there is enough evidence for me to identify the Alice in my database as Alice CARR daughter of Thomas and Sarah CARR, but I won’t 100% until I have seen a copy of the marriage certificate or the entry in the parish register.

I have solved one mystery but uncovered another. What does the C in the page number in birth index mean?

Picture Postcard Parade: St. Peter’s Church, Brighton

30 Aug

This fine looking church is St. Peter’s Church, Brighton, Sussex. This is the church where my 2x great grandparents Henry BATEMAN and Dorothy Isabella KINGHORN married on the 9th November 1881, and probably had their son baptised here the following year.

St Peters Church Brighton

There are virtually no clues as to the publisher or age of this card, there is only the number 1973 on the front which is definitely not the year of publication, because the back of the card (shown below) is undivided which suggests a date prior to 1902.

St Peters Church Brighton (back)

St. Peter’s Church is a relatively modern church and still forms a prominent landmark in Brighton. It is great to have a personal connection to this wonderful building, which I have passed so many times on my way into and out of Brighton.

The marriage certificate of Henry BATEMAN and Dorothy Isabella KINGHORN

23 Aug

I ordered a copy of the marriage certificate for quite specific reasons. In the big scheme of things it was not that important, there were no big mysteries to be solved. If anything it was more about establishing my personal connection with Brighton, Sussex. It has always surprised my that Brighton has not played a bigger part in the lives of my ancestors, but so far my family connections with the city have been few and far between.

Personally I have a bit of a love-hate relationship with Brighton. It is the closest city to where I live, and as such provides many facilities that I need to access from time to time (such as the Brighton History Centre) and acts as a transport hub with buses and trains heading across the country, but Brighton is usually far too busy for my liking, especially at this time of year.

But that’s enough about me, back to my ancestors. Henry BATEMAN married Dorothy Isabella KINGHORN on the 9th November 1881 at St. Peter’s Church, Brighton, Sussex. Henry was 22 years old and he was a groom, nothing surprising there, every other record I have seems to have his as a groom, stableman or coachman.

Dorothy was 27 years old and had no occupation shown. Neither of them had been married before and the marriage took place after banns had been read. The only possible mystery comes from the name of one of the witnesses, Mary Ann WATKINS. I have no idea who she was or whether she was related to either Henry or Dorothy, but I guess if she is a relation I will discover her identity in due course. The other witness was Dorothy’s brother Graham (actually Abraham Graham) KINGHORN.

The only surprise was that they were both living at separate addresses. Henry was at 58 Hanover Street and Dorothy was at 47 Jersey Street. I had expected to find them living at the same address, but I guess I was wrong. It was my impression that they had moved together from Spratton, Northamptonshire to Brighton after Dorothy became pregnant, perhaps they were still trying to maintain at least some impression of decency and doing the right thing. In the 1881 census Dorothy’s brother Graham was living at 79 Hanover Street, which probably explains why they were in that particular part of Brighton.

This certificate has proved quite useful, I now have several things I need to do to follow up the information provided on the certificate:

  1. Visit St. Peter’s Church and get some photographs.
  2. Visit 58 Hanover Street and 47 Jersey Street and get some photographs.
  3. Search the parish registers for St. Peter’s Church for the dates of the banns.
  4. Search the parish registers for St. Peter’s Church for the baptisms of their children.
  5. Check Brighton street directories to see who else was living at 58 Hanover Street and 47 Jersey Street.

Also this certificate has given me a definite connection with Brighton, and one of it’s most famous landmarks, St. Peter’s Church. Every time I go past it on the bus, or get off of the bus there to make my way to Brighton railway station I will be able to look at it knowing that my 2x great-grandparents were married there.

Australian Relations: Annie Clark MCCONACHY (her first marriage)

2 Aug

This is another article in a series of posts about William Joseph Henry BATEMAN, his family and their lives in Australia. This is an ongoing research project, I certainly don’t know all the details yet, so if you can help me fill in any details then please get in touch.

When William Joseph Henry (WJH) married in 1905 his wife was a widow, and she had one child from that previous marriage. Her married name was Annie Clark BULL and her maiden name was MCCONACHY.

Annie’s first marriage was to Reginald Ambrose BULL in Victoria, Australia in 1899. The same year also saw the registration of the birth of their son Sidney Ambrose BULL, although a declaration in his WW1 service record states that he was born on 15th November 1898, in Geelong, Victoria, Australia.

Their brief marriage ended the following year when Reginald Ambrose BULL died. I don’t know the exact circumstances, only that his death was registered that year in Geelong, Victoria.

After Annie and WJH BATEMAN were married Sidney seems to have become part of the new family, and used the surname BATEMAN when he joined the Australian Infantry on the 27th December 1916.

Tragically Sidney was killed in action on the 3rd December 1917 in Belgium, around seven weeks after arriving in France and less than ten months after leaving Australia. He is buried in the Berks Cemetery Extension, Ploegsteert, Belgium. Fortunately none of WJH and Annie’s other children were old enough to serve during the First World War.

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