Tag Archives: london

One week and counting …

17 Feb

A week today sees the start of Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012 at Olympia, London, billed as “the biggest family history event in the world”.

For those that can’t make it to the event Ancestry.co.uk are giving you chance to watch some of their Ancestry Academy presentations online.

In what I believe is a first for WDYTYA Live, Ancestry.co.uk have announced that the following presentations will be streamed live over the internet:

Friday 24th February 2012

10:30-11:15 GMT – First steps: Build your family tree with censuses and birth, marriage and death records

13:30-14:45 GMT – Ancestry.co.uk revealed: the brand new features in the best-selling family history software [not sure about this one, it looks like they might have their timings a bit mixed up]

15:30-16:15 GMT – Before 1837: Discover the events that shaped your ancestors’ lives, and the records they left behind (presented by Tony Robinson)

Saturday 25th February 2012

11:00-11:45 GMT – Going further: Discover your ancestors all over the world with our global records

13:00-13:45 GMT – Parish records: Uncover the records for your area and trace your family all the way back to Tudor times

15:00-15:45 GMT – Getting started: Build your family tree with censuses and birth, marriage and death records

The only drawback (for people like me that have an aversion to social networking) is that they can only be accessed through their Facebook page by following the instructions on their blog.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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Two weeks and counting …

10 Feb

Two weeks today sees the start of Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012 at Olympia, London, billed as “the biggest family history event in the world”.

Everything is in place for my three days family history extravaganza, all that I need now is for the snow to clear off and I am all set.

Looking through the list of exhibitors I noticed a rather surprising, but welcome, addition to the usual list of names. The Weald and Downland Open Air Museum from Singleton, West Sussex will have a stand in the Society of Genealogists’ Family History Show.

The description from the list of exhibitors gives a good idea of what the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum is all about, “Over 45 rescued buildings rebuilt in a beautiful setting in the South Downs National Park, bringing to life homes, farms and workplaces of the South-east over the past 500 years.

Although there isn’t really a direct connection with family history (except there is in my case), it is a perfect fit for those wishing to learn more about the rural lives of their ancestors. Most rural crafts and occupations are represented at the Weald and Downland in one way or another, especially when you factor in the special events that are held throughout the year.

On top of that you can also take courses at the museum, from working with heavy horses to hedgelaying. As is to be expected from the once heavily wooded counties of Southern England there is a particular emphasis on the use of timber, from charcoal burning to construction techniques.

The museum is a superb place to explore, as I have done on several occasions, and not just because it is set in the Singleton in the South Downs, home to many of my ancestors. If you are at WDYTYA Live then make sure you stop by and find out what they have to offer.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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Three weeks and counting …

3 Feb

Three weeks today sees the start of Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012 at Olympia, London, billed as “the biggest family history event in the world”.

All being well I shall be there for all three days, I have booked the time off work and my tickets have been bought (I like the new three-day ticket option), all that is left is to decide which train to catch each day and work out what I am doing whilst I am there.

The third celebrity guest has now been announced, Emilia Fox will be appearing on Saturday 25th February, joining the previously announced Larry Lamb (on Friday 24th February) and Richard Madeley (on Sunday 26th February), making it a hat-trick of celebrities from the most recent series of Who Do You Think You Are? in the UK.

The February 2012 issue of Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine comes with a copy of the show guide, so you can get a head start on planning how you are going to spend your time, although it has to be said that most of the information in the show guide can also be found on the WDYTYA Live website, but I for one find it easier to have all the information bound and gathered in one place.

Another interesting addition to the show this year is a section entitled Our Working Past which is described as a “new, interactive feature for 2012 which aims to throw a little light on the occupations of our ancestors.” In this area you can examine the tools of our ancestor’s trades and learn more about their working lives. I see that the British Postal Museum and Archives are going to be contributing to this area.

Reminder: Don’t forget to buy your ticket for Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012

9 Jan

This is a reminder for me as much as anyone else. We are about a month and a half away from Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012 and I still haven’t bought my ticket.

I have taken my eye off the ball somewhat where WDYTYA? Live is concerned and as it is fast approaching I really ought to start getting organised. I know I say that every year and still every year I leave it to the last minute. I don’t expect this year to be any different. At least I have booked the time off from work, which is the most important bit, but now I need to get my credit card out and buy a ticket.

The website seems quite comprehensive, two out of the three celebrity guest have been announced, Larry Lamb (on Friday 24th February) and Richard Madeley (on Sunday 26th February), both from the most recent television series and neither on my “must see” list this year.

There are plenty of other talks and workshops going on that will make it on to my “must see” list instead, the timetable is almost complete (there are still a few gaps), so I can start choosing what I would like to see, and not standing in the queue for tickets frantically trying to make a decision as I move closer and closer to the front of the queue.

An interesting addition to the schedule is the Keynote Workshop on Saturday afternoon, the interesting thing for me is not the subject (“the development of social networking in technology and how it can help in genealogical research”) but the fact that there is a separate charge for this and it seems to have replaced the “conference within a conference” element of the show from previous years. However, I am not interested enough to warrant buying a ticket, although I might be in a minority.

A quick look through the list of exhibitors throws up the usual mix of stalls, I did notice one or two new names. It looks like the flip-pal scanner could be making its UK debut at show (although the URL for the website just goes to a holding page). There seems to me to be more exhibitors involved in getting your family history into print than previous years, although there are still a fair number of societies and archives due to attend as well.

The Picture Postcard Show 2011

30 Aug

The highlight of the postcard collecting calendar is the annual Picture Postcard Show, also known as BIPEX (British International Postcard Exhibition), which takes place this week, running from Thursday 1st September 2011 to Saturday 3rd September 2011.

The three-day show is held at the Royal Horticultural Society’s Lawrence Hall in Greycoat Street, London and is described as “the world’s most prestigious card show”. Full details including admission prices and opening times can be found on the Postcard Traders Association website.

The Picture Postcard Show is like a normal provincial postcard fair on steroids, with a greater diversity of postcard dealers in attendance, including many from overseas. This means a greater diversity of postcards and as the website says, “some of the best cards available today”.

Unfortunately it doesn’t look like I am going to be able to make it to this year’s show, but you can read about my previous visits here and here.

Copyright © 2011 John Gasson.
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Is it too early to get exicted about Who Do You Think You Are Live 2012?

18 Aug

I must admit I found myself getting just ever so slightly excited the other night about next years Who Do You Think You Are? Live. By a roundabout sort of way I found myself on their website and realised that the dates were there for next years show.

I can’t remember now if I had seen the dates before, I suspect they have been there for a long time, but it was probably far too early last time I looked for it to make much of an impression.

The show is on the 24th, 25th and 26th February 2012, so just over six months away. There are no further details yet on their website, but just having those dates gives me something to look forward to. To be fair it is not the only thing I have to look forward to, but it will probably be the genealogical highlight of the year.

I really ought to be getting excited about the new series of Who Do You Think You Are? in the UK, but in reality this annual family history event is much more interesting to me than the TV programme, because it will have much more relevance to my research.

Perhaps it is a little too early to get excited about Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012 but it is at least time to start getting organised, by booking the time off work and maybe even getting those t-shirts printed that I say I will do every year!

Copyright © 2011 John Gasson.
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Negotiating the roadworks at the LFHC

18 Mar

Don’t be put off by the obstacles if you are planning on visiting the London Family History Centre.

It is not really as awkward as it looks to get across the road and into the building, but it is more than a little disconcerting as you emerge from the London Underground pedestrian subway to be confronted with barriers and fences.

Today when I visited there was a crossing point and break in the fence just to the right of the subway entrance in front of the Science Museum, but I suspect this changes on a fairly regular basis, so that piece of information may not be a lot of use unless you plan to visit in the next few weeks.

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea seem to be the people responsible for the disruption. It is part of the Exhibiton Road Project which according to the project’s website will convert the street to a place “where culture and learning are accessible to people of all ages and backgrounds with a streetscape that makes that ambition a reality.”

The road and pavement are being merged together and re-surfaced and the volume of traffic is being reduced and slowed down, although not completely removed. It sounds like a good idea and probably worth the disruption although it isn’t scheduled for completion until next year.

It seems particularly apt that the London Family History Centre should be part of an area for “culture and learning”, it certainly deserves greater recognition for the work it does and the resources it provides.

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