Tag Archives: horsham

Picture Postcard Parade: West Street, Horsham

4 Apr

This postcard shows one of the main shopping streets in Horsham, Sussex and as such is not particularly unusual. The reason I bought it was to do with the message more than anything else.

West Street, Horsham, West Sussex is now pedestrianised and I pass along it almost every evening on my way home from work. Although the shop fronts have changed the upper floors and roofs of many of the buildings haven’t altered a great deal, on the outside at least.

The interest is in the subject of the message, postcard collecting. To save you standing on your head here is the message the right way up.

Mr D. Bryce of East Street, Horsham was sending this to a fellow collector of PPCs (Picture Postcards) with the hope of receiving similar cards in return. Note the request for views only, obviously he wasn’t interested in postcards of flowers or kittens or such like. The address side of the card adds further interest to the card.

Not only is the card being sent to Mademoiselle A. Trabuchet in France and the postmark reveals quite an early posting date of the 7th July 1903, but it also provides an excellent illustration of the postal regulations in force at the time.

For foreign countries only the front of the card could be used for the message and cost of postage was double the usual rate of half a penny. I am not sure whether this was the official rate for France or whether the sender was just being over-cautious. Either way Mr D. Bryce must have been a very keen collector, I wonder if he got any cards in return?

Personal Genealogy Update: Week 34

22 Aug

I don’t know quite what happened last week, I didn’t really achieve a great deal, in fact I am struggling to remember what I did achieve this week. I guess I have been a bit lazy this week, I have had opportunities to do family history but have been distracted by other things.

I did get started on capturing details from the National Probate Calendar, but I didn’t get far. One entry I did look at was the entry for Thomas DRIVER (my 3x great-grandfather) and this illustrated one of the problems of these entries. The names of the two executors, his daughter and son-in-law, lead to tracing them and their children. It is a good problem to have, but it makes it all very time consuming.

One positive thing that I did do last week was join Surrey libraries. My week means that I have the opportunity to visit Horley library during my lunch break and after work, in fact it will probably be easier to visit Horley library than my local library at Horsham. The main benefit of library membership is access to their online library including the Times Digital Archive and Nineteenth Century Newspapers websites.

I need to try and get focused again this week, I suppose I have been spending more time writing about family history than actually doing any research. I guess it boils down once again to being more organised.

I need to order the copies of wills that I said I was going to last week, and I need to process the two BATEMAN certificates that I didn’t get around to working on last week. Apart from that I will probably just work on capturing more probate entries.

You wait ages for a bus to come along… then dozens turn up at once

13 Jun

Modern buses

I am not really what you would call a bus enthusiast, but being someone who relies on public transport and someone with an interest in many aspects of history I was delighted excited to attend the bus rally at Madeira Drive, Brighton, East Sussex.

The bus rally was to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the Brighton & Hove Bus and Coach Company. Madeira Drive is right on the seafront at Brighton and the buses looked great in the sunshine. There was a large selection of "vintage" and modern buses and several stalls selling all sorts of bus related merchandise.

Brighton Hove & District FUF 63

I think the bus above was one of the oldest on display today, being built just before the Second World War. There was quite a variety of "vintage" buses and I could easy imagine some of my relatives and ancestors climbing aboard buses like these when they needed to go into town.

Some of the "vintage" buses weren’t that old, or at least they didn’t seem so to me because they reminded me of the buses we used to take into Horsham. I think the buses (like the one below) may have been replaced by the time I was old enough to travel on them on my own, although I can’t remember at what age that would have been.

Southdown RUF37R

Walking back to happiness

16 Apr

Last year I used try and walk home from work on a Friday evening, it was a wonderful way to start the weekend. Today it was the other way around, I was making my way into Horsham to pick up some shopping. I also had a couple of other things to do on the way.

This week I have been sorting through GASSON files and came across a monumental inscription which I had transcribed back in March 2003. I discovered that I didn’t have a photo of it, and I am not even sure that I had a digital camera seven years ago.

Not only that, my transcription was different from that provided by the Sussex Family History Group. I felt I should visit Nuthurst, Sussex and get a photo of the headstone and check the inscription. Whilst I was in Nuthurst I also wanted to take a look at New House Farm, where my ancestors were living in the 1841 census.

I had a nice walk, the weather wasn’t brilliant to start with, lots of cloud with the occasional break that let the sunshine through (at least there wasn’t any volcanic ash!). The route was a bit further than my walk home used to be, about 10 miles in all, and I didn’t quite make it all the way to Horsham (I caught the bus for the last little bit).

It was good to get out and forget about job hunting for a few hours, enjoy a bit of sunshine and do a bit of genealogy as well. Just the sort of thing a wandering genealogist should be doing. Plus I got plenty of photos and things to write about along the way, like the one below of the primroses along the side of the disused railway line south of West Grinstead.

Primroses on the Downs Link

The chemist shop at Horsham Museum

18 Mar

My current obsession with chemists and druggists reminded me of a display in Horsham Museum. Amongst their many wonderful exhibits and displays they have a recreation of a local chemist’s shop.

The chemist shop in Horsham Museum

I took the opportunity this week to pop into the museum and have a quick look at the ‘shop’ and try and imagine my 6x great-grandmother standing behind a similar counter in Hailsham, Sussex.

In my imagination the GEERING’s shop in Hailsham had once looked like this, neat and tidy, clean and with a highly polished counter, but I imagine it didn’t last long and over the years it became more and more neglected. I might be doing my ancestors an injustice but the situation described by Thomas Geering in his book was not one of a pristine, well maintained shop.

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