Tag Archives: geering

My genealogy to-do list for the week ahead (week 20)

16 May

It was another bad week for genealogy last week, I don’t think I can cross anything off last week’s to-do list. The problem was that I had under estimated the amount of time it would take to sort through my TROWER folder.

I have nearly finished sorting through the TROWER folder, but it has taken a lot longer than I thought. I suppose this is where I first started researching many years ago, so it is not really that surprising that there should be so much material in the folder.

Many of the files have since been rendered obsolete, so they have just been deleted, and a fair few of the files have been extracted and moved to other surname folders where they belong.

So this coming week I going to be pretty much cutting and pasting last weeks to-do list, with a couple of tweaks.

  • Sort out and capture all the information collected at the West Sussex Record Office (now over a week ago) and update my to-do list.
  • I still need to contact the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain about my GEERINGs to see if they might have some records for my research.
  • Book a seat at the East Sussex Record Office and order the documents I need to view for my GEERING research.
  • Finish sorting through the TROWER folder and then move on to the GEERING folder.

My genealogy to-do list for the week ahead (week 19)

9 May

Last week was an interesting week, I devoted much time going through my digital files, and have made very good progress in getting them sorted. I am now left with 20 surname folders left to sort out. The problem is that these 20 folders are the biggest and most disorganised folders.

I didn’t get any work done in relation to the GEERING family. I fear I am losing momentum on this particular project, so this week I really must get things moving again.

I spent too much time last week looking at websites on trig points and benchmarks. At least I thought it was far too much time, but it was interesting and enjoyable, and I think I might have a new project coming out of it, so in retrospect it probably wasn’t too much time.

By the end of the week I felt I needed to get out and do some proper research, so I took a visit to the West Sussex Record Office to try and tie up some loose ends. Now I have a pile of papers to sort out as well as my digital files.

  • Sort out and capture all the information collected at the West Sussex Record Office, and update my to-do list.
  • I still need to contact the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain about my GEERINGs to see if they might have some records for my research.
  • Book a seat at the East Sussex Record Office and order the documents I need to view for my GEERING research.
  • I am going to tackle ten folders this week, eight of the smaller ones, the TROWER folder, and the GEERING folder (that should help me focus back on where my GEERING research is going).

My genealogy to-do list for the week ahead (week 18)

2 May

I failed to achieve most of what I set out to do last week. I haven’t got in touch with the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain about my GEERINGs and I didn’t create an “exit strategy” for my GEERING research either.

However, I don’t feel too disappointed because I got quite a bit of organising done on my hard drive. I was supposed to have been coming up with a schedule for sorting my files and folders, but instead I just dived straight in and got on with it.

I made quite a pleasing dent in the list of folders to sort and I am going to continue this week. I do have a sort of plan and would like to get my hard drive organisation completed by the end of May. I don’t see myself doing any new research this week, only dealing with stuff I already have.

  • Go through a dozen folders on my hard drive and sort out the contents, updating Family Historian and adding stuff to my to-do list.
  • Contact the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain about my GEERINGs to see if they might have some records for my research.
  • Define an “exit strategy” for my GEERING research, deciding how much more work I want to do on the family before moving on.
  • I didn’t get around to tidying up my computer desk and the spare bedroom, so I must to that this week.

My genealogy to-do list for the week ahead (week 16)

18 Apr

Last week I was a bit of a genealogical magpie, gathering all sorts of  information from various places (mainly local libraries) and taking loads of photos. The problem is that I have taken all this “shiny” information back to my nest and not done anything with it.

This week I really need to get this information sorted out, transcribed and where necessary entered into my family tree. This week I am going to try not to gather any more information until I have sorted out all the new stuff that I have recently acquired.

  • Sort out all the information I have gathered. Scan documents, transcribe my notes, update Family Historian and sort out the digital photos.
  • Continue working through my digital files updating Family Historian and sorting out folders and standardising my filenames.
  • Email East Sussex Record Office to find out which of the GEERING records I want to view are held onsite and which I need to order in.
  • Attend the South Coast Family History Fair on Sunday 25th April 2010 at Worthing, West Sussex.

That should be enough for this week. I really need to get my notes sorted out, and will be happy if I can complete that this week.

My 6x great-grandmother was “the old druggist”

17 Apr

I am finally in a position to be able to say with confidence that my 6x great-grandmother Mary GEERING was the woman that was described by Thomas Geering in his book Our Sussex Parish as “the old druggist”.

It was about eight weeks ago that I first wrote about the discovery of Thomas Geering’s book and set about proving to my own satisfaction that my ancestor was described in the book (so far I have not been able to find a family connection with Thomas Geering himself).

It always seemed quite likely to me that I was related to “the old druggist” and quite often over the past couple of months I have referred to the GEERINGs of Hailsham, Sussex as my ancestors even when I haven’t been 100% certain until now.

The final piece of evidence was the death certificate of Ann GEERING (my 5x great-grandmother), but really it is not just that one piece of evidence but all the other bits of evidence I accumulated over the weeks, and the complete absence of any trace of contradictory evidence.

Although I have achieved my major goal, I still feel that I have a lot more work to do on the GEERINGs before I move on, not least of all to write up their story. I still have a long list of things to-do at the East Sussex Record Office, and a few other records dotted around other archives to check.

I am also aware that I have very nearly missed out a whole generation, jumping from one Richard GEERING (my 4x great-grandfather) to another Richard (my 6x great-grandfather) almost bypassing James GEERING in between. I still need to find out if his wife Ann was in fact a HOWLETT and find out if James did serve with the army and in what capacity.

Death certificate of Ann GEERING

16 Apr

It seems every month I describe a certificate I have received as the most important one for my research or the most interesting one. The death certificate of Ann GEERING certainly fits into both categories, as it has given me critical evidence about my GEERINGs.

This has been the only certificate I have ordered this month, not because of the price increase, but because I wasn’t really sure which, if any, I would need next.

I mentioned the discovery of an Ann GEERING in Lewes, Sussex in the 1841 census in a previous post. This lead me to wonder whether she was my 5x great-grandmother, the wife of James GEERING, who I had previously thought had died much earlier.

The certificate provides enough evidence for me to safely say that Ann was my 5x great-grandmother. Ann GEERING died on the 2nd May 1844 in Lewes, Sussex. The cause of death seems rather unusual to me, paralysis was the official cause, but there is no suggestion as to how this paralysis came about or whether it had been a long term medical condition.

The death was registered by Eliza GEERING of St Johns, Lewes who was present at the death. Eliza is probably my 4x great-grandmother, wife of Richard GEERING. Ann had been living with Richard and Eliza (and their children) in 1841.

The really important piece of information was her occupation, she is described as “Wife of James Geering Chemist”. I have no doubt that this is James GEERING (my 5x great-grandfather) from Hailsham, Sussex. This fact provides me with the link between the GEERINGs in Hailsham and Lewes that I have been looking for.

Now I also have an age at death for Ann, from which I can calculate an approximate year of birth, which I had previously not known. Unfortunately it also raises the question that troubled me in my previous post, why were James and Ann seemingly living apart, and were buried in separate towns? Answers on a postcard please…

High expectations = big disappointment

14 Apr

It seems like I have been waiting for months for the will of Ann GEERING of Hailsham, Sussex (my 6x great-aunt) to arrive. I was hoping this would provide me more details of her relations and confirm a connection between the GEERINGs of Hailsham, Sussex and Lewes, Sussex.

There was such disappointment when I opened the envelope and read the will. The only beneficiary was Ann’s niece Jane. I already know about Jane (the one who drowned in the common pond at Hailsham), I knew she was the sole executrix, but had hoped that someone else also benefited from Ann’s will.

Despite the wait I am no further forward with my research, perhaps it is my fault. Perhaps the disappointment is of my own making, was I creating false expectations about the contents of the will? Yes, with hindsight I probably was expecting too much.

Interestingly there is one further record that is probably related to Ann’s will that I need to investigate. East Sussex Record Office have a series of valuation books from A. Burtenshaw and Son who were auctioneers and valuers in Hailsham.

The valuation book dated March to May 1864 (ESRO BUR/2/1/134) contains an entry described in the catalogue Access to Archives as “p.51 Hailsham: household (late Geering), 1864″. I feel that this has got to be related to the execution of Ann’s will and although it probably won’t help my research, it might give me a bit of an insight into the life of Ann.

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