Tag Archives: free

NEWS: Free access to Canadian Vital Records on Ancestry

16 Feb

Someone at Ancestry must be reading my blog and seeing my need for some Canadian records they have decided that they will open up access to their Canadian Birth, Marriage & Death Collections until the 20th February 2012 (more specifically until 11:59 p.m. (ET) on the 20th February). Either that or it has something to do with Family Day in Canada on the 20th.

The free access (registration required) covers some 28 million records across the following collections:

  • Acadia, Canada, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1670-1946
  • Bells Corners Cemetery (Richmond Road)
  • Births-deaths-marriages, Christian messenger
  • British Columbia, Canada, Birth Index, 1872-1903
  • British Columbia, Canada, Death Index, 1872-1990
  • British Columbia, Canada, Marriage Index, 1872-1935
  • Canada Obituary Collection
  • Canada Parliamentary Marriage and Divorces, 1867-1919
  • Crawford Cemetery, Dalhousie Township, Lanark County
  • Elmview Cemetery, Kars, Ontario, North Gower Township, lot 24, conc. 1
  • Kitchener, Ontario German War Graves
  • London Press (Ontario) Obituaries, 1998-99
  • Mariages de l’Enfant-Jesus de la Pointe-aux-Trembles, 1674-1975
  • Marriage Notices of Ontario 1813-1854
  • Nova Scotia, Canada, Births, 1836-1910
  • Nova Scotia, Canada, Deaths, 1864-1877, 1890-1960
  • Nova Scotia, Canada, Marriages, 1763-1935
  • Ontario Marriage Notices [1830-1856]
  • Ontario, Canada Births, 1869-1913
  • Ontario, Canada Marriage Registers by Clergy, 1896-1948
  • Ontario, Canada Marriages, 1801-1928
  • Ontario, Canada Obituaries, 1999-2001: Kitchener Record and Windsor Star
  • Ontario, Canada, Catholic Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1747-1967
  • Ontario, Canada, County Marriage Registers, 1858-1869
  • Ontario, Canada, Deaths, 1869-1938 and Deaths Overseas, 1939-1947
  • Ontario, Canada: Civil Marriage Registrations, 1869-73
  • Ontario, Canada: Roman Catholic Marriages, 1827-1870
  • Ottawa, Canada, Beechwood Cemetery Registers, 1873-1990
  • Quebec, Genealogical Dictionary of Canadian Families (Tanguay Collection), 1608-1890
  • Quebec, Vital and Church Records (Drouin Collection), 1621-1967
  • Répertoire des mariages de Sainte-Cécile-de-Masham, comté de Gatineau : 1853-1963
  • Répertoire des mariages du Lac-Sainte-Marie (Comté de Gatineau) : (1881-1963)
  • Repertoire des mariages, Sainte-Anne-de-la-Perade, 1684-1900
  • Riverside Cemetery Index, New Hambug, Ontario
  • Scottish-American Gravestones, 1700-1900
  • Sheldon Cemetery
  • St. James Anglican Church Cemetery, Hudson, Quebec, Vaudreuil County.
  • St. Paul’s United Church Cemetery (the old Methodist cemetery), Richmond, Ontario
  • St. Stephen’s Anglican Cemetery, Papineau County, Buckingham, Quebec
  • St. Thomas Anglican Church Cemetery, Stanley’s Corners (formerly Rathwell’s Corners)
  • The Denny Cemetery near Philipsville, Ontario
  • Toronto Star Obituaries, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1999 – April 2000, February 2001
  • Waterloo County, Ontario, Cemetery Inscriptions
  • Web: CanadianHeadstones.com Index, 1700-2010
  • Woodland Cemetery Records, Kitchener, Ontario
  • Zion Cemetery, Scarborough, York County, Ontario

What’s in it for me…

As you can see there is a definite shortage of Alberta records, which is where my attention is currently focused. However, I shall be taking full advantage of this free access to search for Patrick and Kate Vaughan and their children, as there is no guarantee that they remained in Alberta. Also there are one or two other relations scattered in my family tree that ended up in Canada that I haven’t really looked into, including Kate’s brother Asher.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License
.

Free accesss to Ancestry.co.uk census indexes on the 27th March 2011

22 Mar

To mark the fact that Sunday 27th March 2011 is census day in the UK, Ancestry.co.uk will be allowing free access to their UK census indexes for the whole day.

After checking the census indexes however you will need a membership subscription, to sign up for a free 14-day trial or to use pay-as-you-go credits to view the actual images of the original pages (except for the Scottish ones that Ancestry aren’t allowed to display).

According to the post by Kelly Godfrey on the Ancestry.co.uk blog “census records are the perfect first step. They list everybody in each household all over the country, together with crucial details such as their ages and birthplaces. So, you can quickly and easily collect names and dates for several generations.”

Just don’t get too carried away and forget that you are also supposed to be filling in the 2011 census on the same day.

NEWS: Society of Genealogists’ collection now online at findmypast.co.uk

5 Jan

What better way to mark the start of the Society of Genealogists‘ centenary year than with the release of 9 million records from their collection on findmypast.co.uk? If that wasn’t enough, the SoG are now providing free access to findmypast.co.uk (including the 1911 census) for users of their library.

The first batch of records features the following collections:

  • Boyd’s Marriage Index containing over 7 million names from 1538 to 1840
  • Boyd’s London Burials 1538-1872 containing 240,000 names
  • Faculty Office Marriage Licence Allegations 1701-1850
  • St Andrew’s Holborn Marriage Index 1754-1812
  • Vicar-General Marriage Licences Allegations 1694-1850
  • St Leonard Shoreditch Burials 1805-1858 and Workhouse Deaths 1820-1828
  • Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills Index 1750-1800

These records are only indexes or transcripts but in some cases it is possible to order copies of some of the originals from the SoG. Previous collaborations between the two organisations have resulted in the publication online of the Civil Service Evidence of Age and Great Western Railway Shareholder records and according to the press release from findmypast and the SoG there is still more to come:

In the coming weeks further records will be added to the website including Bank of England Wills Extracts containing 60,500 names, including images, and Apprentices of Great Britain containing 350,000 names.

It is great that these records are being released to a wider audience, these and the other collections and resources of the SoG really do deserve to be better known and utilised, personally as a member of the society I am guilty myself of not making the most of these resources.

Ancestry.co.uk marking Remembrance Week with three new databases

9 Nov

Not content with allowing free access to three of their WW1 collections (British Army WW1 Service Records, British Army WW1 Pension Records and British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards) up to Sunday 14th November 2010, they have also released three new collections for tracing military ancestors and relatives, however these are not free to view.

All three collections relate to medals and awards:

Military Campaign Medal and Award Rolls, 1793-1949

These records list more than 2.3 million soldiers who were granted medals and awards in non-WWI or WWII campaigns, between 1793 and 1949.

Naval Medal and Award Rolls, 1793-1972

The Naval medal rolls list more than 1.5 million officers, enlisted personnel and other individuals who served in the Royal Navy or Royal Marines between 1793 and 1972. They cover a range of conflicts, including World War Two.

Citations of the Distinguished Conduct Medals, 1914-1920

These records cover the Great War and feature almost 25,000 citations for recipients of the Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) – Britain’s second highest military honour for non-commissioned officers and enlisted personnel.

Find out more about these collections and the other military resources at the Ancestry.co.uk British Military Collection page.

Findmypast.co.uk free access – my world cup warm-up

26 Jun

Could tomorrow be our last chance for free access to Findmypast.co.uk? I wouldn’t dream of making a prediction on the outcome of England’s match tomorrow, but I need to make sure I get the most out of the free 90 minutes.

The last time England played I was on my way back from walking part of the South Downs Way, and by the time I got home I didn’t really have the energy and wasn’t really prepared for my 90 minutes and so most of it was wasted. This time I need to be better prepared, it could be my last chance for another four years!

I have a subscription to the 1911 census (which will soon run out, but that is another issue I need to consider) so I can ignore that. I have been through the indexes for the Chelsea Pensioners British Army Service Records and I don’t think there is anyone there that I need yet, although I could do a bit more searching on some of my surnames and places just in case they turn out to be related in the future.

Although I have access to Ancestry.co.uk there are a few people I haven’t been able to find in their indexes. I might stand a better chance with different set of indexes, it is certain worth a try.

Similarly, whilst Ancestry have GRO birth, marriage and death indexes up to 2005, findmypast has the indexes up to 2006. It is probably worth searching the births, marriages and deaths for that extra year?

Now I am off to have another look around the findmypast website. Which other collections have I forgotten that I should be checking?

  • Passenger lists leaving UK 1890-1960 – were released several years ago now, is there anyone that might be in those lists that I have forgotten? Did any of my relations that left the country (or their descendants) ever come back to visit? On a similar track, I don’t think I have ever checked for passport applications, perhaps now would be a good time to have a look and see what is in that database.
  • Parish Records Collection 1538-2005 – findmypast have a large collection of parish register transcription, formerly on the Family History Online website and provided in association with the Federation of Family History Societies. Who might be lurking in those records? It could be worth looking again as my research has moved on since the closure of Family History Online.
  • Index to death duty registers 1796-1903 – I have never really looked at these death duty registers, so now would be a good time to have a poke around in these records to see what is included in them rather than just looking for my relations.

If you are not already registered then make sure you get along to their website and register by midnight tonight (26th June). You can find full details on their website, and don’t be blinded by the 1911 census and Chelsea Pensioners Records, there are plenty of other record types that could reveal far more interesting details about your family (the divorce indexes are another example).

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 119 other followers

%d bloggers like this: