Tag Archives: east sussex record office

Tombstone Tuesday: an invoice

23 Mar

Another Tombstone Tuesday post with a difference. The invoice below was sent to my 2x great-grandmother Annie TROWER, for the supply and installation of a headstone at Sayers Common Churchyard. I believe that the headstone on the invoice is that of Annie’s sister-in-law Ruth TROWER, who died on the 3rd February 1950, aged 85 years.

Invoice for headstone (April 1951)

The business records for C.F. Bridgman Ltd have been deposited at East Sussex Record Office (in April 1965). There seems to be a huge range of records in the collection, so if I wanted to (and had the time) I could probably trace the whole process of getting the headstone made and installed.

My genealogy to-do list for the week ahead (week 12)

21 Mar

Another week passed with very little actual research achieved and very little sorting and organising achieved either. That doesn’t mean I haven’t been doing any work, most of my time has been spent on planning and background reading.

I really need to get some sorting out this week, before I do any more serious research and make matters worse. My organising has slowed almost to a standstill, and I really need to get back into a routine again of systematically going through my files and folders.

I continue to be amazed at how many leads keep turning up in my GEERING research, I now have three certificates to process, which are presenting some interesting questions and answers. Hopefully this week will also see the arrival of the will of Ann GEERING.

  • Continue working through my digital files updating Family Historian and sorting out folders and standardising my filenames, especially the recently scanned documents.
  • Continue pulling together all my plans for researching the GEERING family of Hailsham, Sussex. The number of archives I need to visit is growing on a weekly basis, although it is probably going to be the East Sussex Record Office that will be the most important.
  • I have three GEERING certificates to process and two wills (and a possible third one arriving this week). There are a few other facts that I need to record as well.
  • I feel it is time that I put together a narrative or timeline for the GEERING family. This will hopefully help clarify my research plans and form the basis of a proper narrative which I hope will be the end result of my research.

GEERING research update

16 Mar

My research into the GEERINGs of Hailsham, Sussex is proving to be both rewarding and challenging, and I might even go as far as to say exciting.

I am exploring new areas, both in geographical terms and in terms of sources I can use. I am fortunate of course that Hailsham is not too far away (less than two hours by bus and train) and the records even closer (mostly at the East Sussex Record Office in Lewes).

I am also fortunate that there seems to be plenty of records for Hailsham that have survived. For example this is the first time I have been researching in a parish where there is a pre-1841 census still in existence.

Hailsham actually has two, the 1821 and 1831. Of course the details will be very limited (just the head of household) but the very fact that an ancestor should be listed in a pre-1841 census that has survived got me quite excited!

The weak link in my research is proving that James GEERING (the father of my 4x great-grandfather) is the same James GEERING who was the son of Richard and Mary “the old druggist” GEERING. I am hoping that the comment by Thomas Geering in his book Our Sussex Parish that James was a barrack-sergeant might lead to more information (time for a visit to The National Archives).

It seems a long time since I got so deeply wrapped up in a piece of research, and it feels so good! The only problem is that there seems so much to do, but oddly enough this seems to be working in my favour as well, because it is forcing me to be more methodical and better prepared for when I do get to visit an archive.

I really need to spend some time with the Framfield burial registers

10 Dec

It looks like I have very strong roots in the parish of Framfield, Sussex. This is very pleasing because not only does it seem a nice place and it is quite easy for me to visit, but also it is quite easy for me to access the records for the parish.

The original registers are held at the East Sussex Record Office (ESRO) in Lewes, East Sussex, but I already have easy access to indexes of the baptisms and marriages for the parish, thanks to the hard work of the Sussex Family History Group.

The one area I am lacking is burial records. I really need to pay the ESRO a visit and spend some serious time with the parish registers. I know it is not going to be a quick exercise, although I think the ESRO already have an unpublished index/transcription for some of the registers.

There must be hundreds of relations buried at Framfield, for which I have only found a few gravestones from my visit earlier in the year. I can see I am going to have to spend several hours in front of a microfilm reader extracting records in the new year.

The missing wife of William RUSSELL

21 Oct

One of the weak links on my Christmas Tree Project is the wife of William RUSSELL, my 4x great grandfather and mother of my 3x great grandfather Thomas RUSSELL.

I know that Thomas’ father was William from his marriage entry in the Ticehurst parish registers. From that I also know that his father’s occupation was that of a shoemaker.

All the census information I have points to a birth for Thomas in Salehurst, Sussex around 1822-23, and although the Salehurst baptisms have been included in the Sussex Family History Group (SFHG) Data Archive, I can’t for the life of me find Thomas’ baptism.

I think I have found Thomas with his father (and brother George) in the 1841 Census, in Salehurst, but there is no sign of a wife for William. There is an older woman, Lydia RUSSELL, who is probably William’s mother (making William the son of Samuel and Lydia RUSSELL).

In 1861 William is living with Elkanah RUSSELL and family in Burwash, Sussex and it could well be that Elkanah is another son. It is an unusual name so it should stand out in the records.

So who was William’s wife? The SFHG Marriage Index gives a couple of marriages around the right time for William RUSSELL in Salehurst, Sussex, and the most likely of these is to Ann SPICE on the 27th April 1811.

My best bet however is to try and locate the baptism for Thomas RUSSELL, that should give me his mother’s name, but if not in Salehurst then where. I searched the baptism transcriptions for Salehurst and surrounding parishes at the East Sussex Record Office last week without any luck.

I wasn’t until I got home that I discovered a birth record for Elkanah RUSSELL, amongst the non-conformist records on BMDregisters.co.uk. This confirmed his parents as William RUSSELL and Ann SPICE, but there was still no sign of Thomas.

So all the evidence points to William RUSSELL and Ann SPICE being the parents of Thomas RUSSELL, but the connection is not quite as strong as I would like.

The problem with the BMDregisters website is that it is not obvious what records are included and whether any other records exist at the National Archives. There is of course the chance that records might survive locally as well, so I need to check with the East Sussex Record Office again.

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