Tag Archives: cemetery

NEWS: Records for UK’s largest cemetery now on Deceased Online

16 Feb

Deceased Online have completed (almost) the release of 800,000 records from the UK largest cemetery (in terms of the number of burials).

With the exception of approximately 20,000 remaining entries (which are still being added) the records for St Pancras and Islington Cemetery in north London have been made available on the website. Searching the website is free and the amount you pay to view the results depends on just what is found. This should include a scan of the burial register, but might also include photographs of the headstone and/or a map of the exact location of the grave.

St Pancras and Islington Cemetery was the first publicly owned cemetery to be opened in London and was officially opened in July 1854. It seems to have developed in a very piecemeal fashion, involving various parishes and boroughs over the decades, all helping to create a very interesting but complicated history.

The cemetery is now jointly run by the London Boroughs of Camden and Islington, and more details can be found on their websites, including details of the bus service that operates across the 190 acre site. I must put it on my list of places to explores because it sounds like there are some wonderful memorials there.

This addition to Deceased Online, strengthens the position of the site as the place to go online to find UK burial and cremation records, by my calculations this takes the total records on the website to over 1.75 million names from across the UK, but it doesn’t stop there.

According to the website they “are currently digitising 1.6 million burial and cremation records to add to our database, from 14 burial and cremation authorities around the UK. Nearly 2 million further records are due to be added from another 13 authorities. And we are in serious talks with a further 31 authorities about bringing nearly 5.3 million more records to the website.”

NEWS: London’s largest cemetery now on Deceased Online

6 Dec

Deceased Online have added another 575,000 London burial and cremation records to their website, taking the total number of London records available on their site to over 1.1 million.

This latest batch of records date from 1854 and come from the St. Pancras and Islington Cemetery in north London. This cemetery covers the boroughs of Islington and Camden and according to the site is the largest single cemetery in London. The cemetery has its own entry on Wikipedia which provides a some basic details on the history of the cemetery and some of its famous residents.

According to the press release not all the records are on the site yet, “of the 800,000 burial records, approximately 70% of these are available immediately with the remainder to be uploaded within the next 3 to 4 months. The 575,000 records currently available comprise nearly 362,000 for the Islington section between 1854 and 1945 and the remaining 213,000 for the St Pancras section are for 1854 to 1898, and 1905 to 1911. Also available now are 46,500 records from Islington Crematorium which date back to 1937. The 8,500 most recent cremation records will be added in the next few months, together with the remaining cemetery records.

Not only will the remaining burial records be uploaded, but in the next few months “maps of areas in the cemetery indicating grave locations will be uploaded together with photographs of many notable memorials and headstones.”

Deceased Online is a perfect complement to the National Burial Index CD (from the Federation of Family History Services), together they provide a pair of essential resources for locating the burial place of UK individuals, especially as Deceased Online continues to expand covering more of the country. Sadly I don’t think I have any relations in this cemetery, but with such a large number of records you never know who you might find waiting to be discovered.

More dead Londoners on Deceased Online

20 Aug

The UK pay-per-view website Deceased Online have announced the addition of almost 100,000 more burial records from South London. This latest update features four cemeteries from the London Borough of Merton, and includes burial records dating from 1883 up to the beginning of 2010 (although dates vary for each cemetery).

According to their website the cemeteries added are:

  • Church Road Cemetery (also known as St Peter’s & St Paul’s Cemetery), Church Road, Mitcham, Surrey
  • Gap Road Cemetery (also known as Wimbledon Cemetery), Gap Road, Wimbledon, London
  • London Road Cemetery (also known as Figge’s Marsh Cemetery), London Road, Mitcham, Surrey
  • Merton & Sutton Joint Cemetery (also known as Garth Road Cemetery), Garth Road, Morden, Surrey

The London Borough of Merton joins the boroughs of Brent, Havering, Islington and Camden in having records available on the website. It is not just about London though, there are records from across the UK, the most relevant for me being the Kent and Sussex Crematorium.

You can find a complete list of all the cemeteries and crematoria already included on Deceased Online at their website, they are also busy “digitising nearly two million burial and cremation records to add to our database, from 15 burial and cremation authorities around the UK”. There has never been a better time to look for dead people!

Deceased Online just keeps on growing

15 Jun

Deceased Online is steadily growing into one of the major online databases for UK researchers. They estimate that by the end of this year they will have a massive 4 million burial and cremation records on the site, and that will increase to 10 million by the end of 2011.

The total currently available is being boosted this month by the addition of approximately 250,000 new records from four areas. According their press release, the four new areas are:

  • City of Aberdeen, Scotland
  • Salcombe, Devon, England
  • Newark, Nottinghamshire, England
  • London Borough of Brent, England

Visit the website (www.deceasedonline.com) and check the exact details for coverage of cemeteries and crematoria in each area (links are at the bottom right-hand corner of their home page), as all these areas cover more than one cemetery or crematoria and the one you are after may not have been uploaded yet, so keep checking back.

The website works on a pay-per-view system, although searching is free (and a subscription package is apparently in the pipeline). The type of record found can vary from a scan of the burial register to transcription and you may even be able to get a plan of the burial location or an image of the memorial. The number of credits needed varies accordingly, full details are again on their website.

My genealogy to-do list for the week ahead (week 11)

14 Mar

Last week was a much better week for my genealogy, not that I really achieved a great deal in terms of adding people to my family tree (I blame Google Street View in part for that).

What happened is that I got sucked into researching the GEERING family from Hailsham, Sussex. It is proving an interesting challenge, there are several leads that I need to follow up and have been preparing for a visit to both the East Sussex Record Office and The National Archives. I have ordered three certificates (more about them in another post) and a copy of a will, which may give me further clues.

I did continue sorting out some more stuff on my hard drive, but I need to devote more time to that, I have lots of new scanned images which need naming and filing correctly.

So this week I intend to:

  • Continue working on the GEERINGs of Hailsham. In particular I want to get the information from the two wills from the West Sussex Record Office included in Family Historian.
  • Contact Hailsham library to find out what local history resources they hold. What books do they hold? Any photographs? Copies of parish registers?
  • Find out if anyone has recorded monumental inscriptions for Hailsham churchyard and Hailsham cemetery.
  • Work out how and when I can get to Hailsham to visit the library, the church, the cemetery and to try and find what remains if anything of the GEERING’s shop.
  • Continue working on a list of records in preparation for a visit to the East Sussex Record Office and The National Archives. Work out when I am going to get the chance to visit them!
  • Continue working through my digital files updating Family Historian and sorting out folders and standardising my filenames, especially the recently scanned documents.

Are the Brookwood Cemetery records going online?

23 Feb

An email from Deceased Online announcing the release of approximately 32,000 burial records and 143,000 cremation records from Cambridge City Cemetery also hints at a forthcoming record release.

According to the email “…. the UK’s biggest cemetery (by burials) is coming to http://www.deceasedonline.com very soon.”

My immediate thought was Brookwood Cemetery, I checked the Brookwood website and they claim it is “the largest cemetery in Britain and is probably the largest in Western Europe.”

I could be jumping to conclusions here, but it sounds to me as if the Brookwood Cemetery Records are going to be available online later this year. The significance is that Brookwood was the main burial place for Londoners after 1854.

Brookwood Cemetery near Woking, Surrey was opened in 1854, and once boasted two railway stations receiving trains from it’s own railway terminus in London. According to their website there have been over 235,000 burials since 1854.

If my guess is correct the release of this database should elevate Deceased Online to the ‘A’ list British genealogy websites. Watch this space!

UPDATED 26/02/2010:  I spoke to a respresentative from Deceased Online today, and sadly it is not Brookwood they are talking about, not yet anyway.

Why I fell in love with Lewes Cemetery

16 Oct

I was down at Lewes, East Sussex again today. Apart from a brief visit to the East Sussex Record Office I also wanted to visit Lewes Cemetery. I knew there had to be relations buried there, and wanted to get a feel for what the place was like and what would be involved in trying to locate them.

I had taken a peek at an aerial view of the cemetery on Google Maps and knew it was big, but I hadn’t quite appreciated how big it was until I actually got there.

It was obvious that I wouldn’t be able to check every gravestone in the time I had, so I just wandered around the cemetery scanning as many headstones as I could trying to pick out any family names. Obviously this wasn’t going to be very successful, but I did come up with a few GEERING gravestones including that of William and Emily GEERING, my 2x great grandparents.

Two GEERING graves at Lewes Cemetery

Two GEERING graves at Lewes Cemetery

There were three things that really stood out for me about Lewes Cemetery, that made me fall in love with the place straight away. Firstly was the position, it is on a south facing slope (they should be growing grapes there) with fantastic views across to the South Downs to the east and west.

View of the South Downs from Lewes Cemetery

View of the South Downs from Lewes Cemetery

Secondly, there was the condition of the cemetery. It was immaculate, all credit to the Lewes District Council and their contractors, there was hardly a blade of grass out of place. I was expecting to find some areas overgrown and abandoned to nature, but no it was all well trimmed and very neat and tidy, so no scrambling through the undergrowth needed.

Thirdly, and this made me smile because it was totally unexpected. They have their own public toilets. In my limited experience of cemeteries I have never come across one with a toilet, admittedly most of my ancestors were buried in small rural cemeteries or churchyards so my experience of large town cemeteries is very limited. It was a shame I didn’t need to use the facilities at the time!

One of the memorials at Lewes Cemetery

One of the memorials at Lewes Cemetery

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