Tag Archives: carlisle

Closure of Carlisle Record Office

5 Apr

The bad news is that Carlisle Record Office will be closing on the 29th April 2010. The good news is that it will be re-opening in January 2011 (if all goes according to plan) in a new building.

When I read the news I was a bit annoyed, not by the closure, these things happen and it is surely for the best in the long run.

No, I was annoyed at myself. I have been saying for months that I was going to go to the Carlisle Record Office and pursue my KINGHORN ancestors. Now I have just under four weeks to make it happen or I will have to wait until next year.

So, I have to make a very quick decision and if I decide to go I will need to do a lot of preparation and research. I am not even sure what I expect to find there. I don’t even believe that Thomas KINGHORN came from Carlisle (I think he was originally from London, but that is another story) and I am not even sure that he spent much time in Carlisle.

There are a few parish register entries that I need to check, but that could be done at one of the other libraries that will be providing access to some of the resources. What I am really interested in is finding records of taxes and rates, that might tell me when Thomas was actually in Carlisle.

So as hard as it may be for me, I am going to have to make a decision, either to visit Carlisle or to put this particular part of my research on hold for the rest of the year.

Feeling sorry for myself

22 Jun

I was feeling very sorry for myself last night, I suppose you could call it a case of “Sunday night blues”, tomorrow would see me back at work again and I felt like I hadn’t really achieved anything this weekend.

Now don’t get me wrong, it had been quite a productive weekend, but you couldn’t really call cleaning the fridge and oven and mowing the grass achievements. Sunday was father’s day, so I had also spent some quality time round my parents house, enjoying dinner.

I suppose my problem was that I hadn’t actually found out anything new on my family tree, in fact I had done very little research during the previous week.

There were other factors, like the headache I had been unable to shake off, the aching shoulders (probably from cleaning the oven), the fact that Sunday was the longest day and although summer had just begun the days would soon be getting shorter and of course the feeling that in terms of walking I was probably not going to be able to beat my Sussex Day walk in terms of distance or enjoyment.

All this was conspiring to make me feel quite miserable!

The problem with my family tree is that my main projects all require a visit to the archives to make any more real progress, something which I don’t have the time and money to do. What I really needed was to focus on something I could do at home, between visits to the archives.

With access to ancestry.co.uk and various Sussex resources courtesy of the Sussex Family History Group, virtually any of my Sussex ancestors would be fair game.

Ideally I would like to find a family line with very local roots, preferably in the Horsham district, so I can use the resources of Horsham Library during my lunch break or after work. The added bonus of a local family is that it would be that much easier for me to visit their ancestral homes or search graveyards.

I can think of one or two families that might fit the bill and one in particular (the FAIRS family of West Grinstead) which I know I have quite a bit of research material on already.

I will keep my other projects active, and will fill in what details I can, but I won’t be able to make any major advances until I have visited Winchester, Carlisle or London again.

Thinking about KINGHORN migration

28 May

I said in yesterday’s post that I needed to find some new avenues to explore on my research projects, so in an attempt to breathe new life into my floundering Thomas KINGHORN research (my 3x great grandfather), I have turned my thoughts to migration.

Thomas KINGHORN (4x great grandfather) and his wife Margaret had (to my knowledge) six children. It appears that at least half of these moved to London (including my 3x great grandfather) in the first half of the nineteenth century. This raises lots questions which I would like to explore further.

  • Which of the six children actually migrated and which stayed in Carlisle?
  • When did they migrate? Did they all move at the same time?
  • Where did they settle in London? What influenced that choice?
  • What was the reason they left Carlisle? Was it to find work? To live with other family members? Was it for better living conditions?
  • How would they have travelled down south? Did they use the mail coach?
  • Why did they chose London? Why not Glasgow, Edinburgh or any other northern city?

Some of these are obviously going to be easier to answer than others (the who, when and where), but hopefully once I have established these facts I can see if any patterns emerge and if any conclusions can be drawn from the data.

Even if I can’t answer all the questions, it is going to help me build up a picture of the family as a whole, which will ultimately help my understanding of the lives of both of my Thomas KINGHORNs.

Gruesome discovery in a Carlisle Coffee House

28 May

Talking of distractions, I came across a rather gruesome burial entry in the St Cuthbert’s, Carlisle, Cumberland Bishop’s Transcripts at the weekend.

“A Man Name unknown packed in a Box & brought by a Manchester Coach” was buried at St. Cuthbert’s on the 10th December 1827. His abode was given as “Coffee House Parish of Saint Cuthbert Carlisle”, and his age was “Supposed 50 years”.

I would love to find out more about this burial and the story behind it,  but I will resist the urge, even though I am sure there is a really interesting story behind it, I am sure the local newspaper would have covered it.

Am I the only one who sees a story like this and wonders if there is a genealogist somewhere who is looking for this man, cursing the fact that they can’t find a burial record for him?

Finding some details on Thomas and Margaret KINGHORN

24 May

Before my visit to the London Family History Centre (LFHC) on Saturday, I had very little hard information on Thomas KINGHORN, my 4x great grandfather. I knew he married Margaret SEWELL in Carlisle on the 5th May 1803 and they had six children between then and 1817. He worked as a guard on a mail coach, and was involved in an accident in 1808, when he narrowly escaped death. I also knew from his son’s marriage certificate that he had died before 1850.

What I really wanted to find out at the LFHC was when he died and how old he was when he died, so I could work out roughly when he was born. I had identified two possible short cuts to this information:

  1. A list of monumental inscriptions for the parish church of St Cuthbert, Carlisle, where he was married and his children subsequently baptised.
  2. An index to wills and administrations from 1800 to 1858 for the Diocese of Carlisle.

Unfortunately the only copy of the first one I knew of locally was at the Society of Genealogist’s library across the city, not at the LFHC, so that was a complete non-starter.

The second one was available on microfilm at the LFHC, but unfortunately there were no entries for Thomas or Margaret KINGHORN, in fact there were no KINGHORNs at all.

The only option left was to take the long route and search through the burial records in the bishops transcript’s for the parish of St Cuthbert’s, Carlisle, Cumberland. Starting in 1817 when their youngest child was baptised I went through year by year.

I finally found Thomas KINGHORN in 1833, except his name was spelt KINGHORNE (close enough for me), he was buried on the 4th May. His age was given as 52 years, which means he was born around 1781. His abode was given as Crosby Street. Compared to what I knew before that one record has probably doubled my knowledge of Thomas KINGHORN in one hit.

I continued to see if the were any other KINGHORN burials but there weren’t until the 15th May 1850 when, his wife Margaret was buried, she was aged 73 years and her address was South Street. So Margaret was around four years older than Thomas being born around 1777.

Although it seems likely that these two are my 4x great grandparents there is nothing that conclusively says they are. The lack of a will (or wills) doesn’t help, but perhaps a monumental inscription will at least show if they were buried together.

I already had the GRO death index entry for Margaret, so I need to order the death certificate and see if that holds any further information, like the fact that she was the widow of Thomas KINGHORN.

I can also now plan to visit the British Library Newspaper Library and check the Carlisle newspapers around those dates, and see if either of them got a mention. If Thomas died in the course of his duty as mail guard then that would be sure to be mentioned, but I doubt I will be that lucky.

Also I now have some more details to take with me to the British Postal Museum and Archive, to see if they have anything that might shed light on his service.

So lots more avenues to explore now, and a couple of streets to visit when I finally get up Carlisle.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 113 other followers

%d bloggers like this: