Tag Archives: burial

More dead Londoners on Deceased Online

20 Aug

The UK pay-per-view website Deceased Online have announced the addition of almost 100,000 more burial records from South London. This latest update features four cemeteries from the London Borough of Merton, and includes burial records dating from 1883 up to the beginning of 2010 (although dates vary for each cemetery).

According to their website the cemeteries added are:

  • Church Road Cemetery (also known as St Peter’s & St Paul’s Cemetery), Church Road, Mitcham, Surrey
  • Gap Road Cemetery (also known as Wimbledon Cemetery), Gap Road, Wimbledon, London
  • London Road Cemetery (also known as Figge’s Marsh Cemetery), London Road, Mitcham, Surrey
  • Merton & Sutton Joint Cemetery (also known as Garth Road Cemetery), Garth Road, Morden, Surrey

The London Borough of Merton joins the boroughs of Brent, Havering, Islington and Camden in having records available on the website. It is not just about London though, there are records from across the UK, the most relevant for me being the Kent and Sussex Crematorium.

You can find a complete list of all the cemeteries and crematoria already included on Deceased Online at their website, they are also busy “digitising nearly two million burial and cremation records to add to our database, from 15 burial and cremation authorities around the UK”. There has never been a better time to look for dead people!

If not Hailsham, then where? The missing burial of Jane GEERING

3 Jul

You may remember me writing about Jane GEERING before, she was my 5x great-aunt who was found drowned in the Common Pond, Hailsham, Sussex.

I know quite a bit about her death, from the reports in the local newspapers and her death certificate, but I did not know where she was buried. I had checked the transcripts of the parish registers for the church at Hailsham, and she hadn’t been buried in the churchyard there (and I have checked the original registers now).

I wasn’t entirely surprised, she died in 1874, two years after the cemetery at Hailsham was opened, and the fact that she probably committed suicide all pointed to the fact that she would have been buried in the cemetery. Of course if it was that straight forward I wouldn’t be writing this post.

I have checked the transcript of burials for the cemetery and she is not listed in there either. I know it is only a transcript, but it looks accurate. The entry numbers from the burial register have also been transcribed, so they haven’t missed an entry, and there is nothing like the name Jane GEERING, so I don’t doubt that she is not in the register.

Perhaps she was buried in the church or cemetery and it was not recorded in the appropriate register, but this seems unlikely. It seems more likely that she was buried somewhere else, but where?

The only other option I can think of is Lewes, Sussex. Her closest relatives, her nieces and nephews were living in Lewes, but I can’t imagine why they would go to the expense of having her body transported to Lewes for burial.

Deceased Online just keeps on growing

15 Jun

Deceased Online is steadily growing into one of the major online databases for UK researchers. They estimate that by the end of this year they will have a massive 4 million burial and cremation records on the site, and that will increase to 10 million by the end of 2011.

The total currently available is being boosted this month by the addition of approximately 250,000 new records from four areas. According their press release, the four new areas are:

  • City of Aberdeen, Scotland
  • Salcombe, Devon, England
  • Newark, Nottinghamshire, England
  • London Borough of Brent, England

Visit the website (www.deceasedonline.com) and check the exact details for coverage of cemeteries and crematoria in each area (links are at the bottom right-hand corner of their home page), as all these areas cover more than one cemetery or crematoria and the one you are after may not have been uploaded yet, so keep checking back.

The website works on a pay-per-view system, although searching is free (and a subscription package is apparently in the pipeline). The type of record found can vary from a scan of the burial register to transcription and you may even be able to get a plan of the burial location or an image of the memorial. The number of credits needed varies accordingly, full details are again on their website.

Where did Vernon Alphonso GASSON get his name from?

21 May

One of the curious records that I transcribed at the West Sussex Record Office a couple of weeks ago was the baptism of Vernon Alphonso GASSON. He was the son of John and Alice Catherine Maud GASSON and was baptised at the parish church in Slaugham, Sussex on the 8th September 1907.

Now don’t get me wrong, but the name Vernon Alphonso doesn’t strike me as an English name, let alone a Sussex one. So where did he get it from?

I thought that Alice Catherine Maud might not have been from England, but her name doesn’t sound particularly exotic. This was further confirmed when I checked FreeBMD for a marriage, Alice’s maiden name was MITCHELL (they were married in Q3 1906 in Cuckfield Registration District).

So I have no idea where the name Vernon Alphonso came from, it certainly doesn’t appear to be a family name. Sadly Vernon Alphonso died in 1910 and was buried in Slaugham on the 26th November.

There must have been some confusion when it came to filling in the 1911 census because Vernon is included with his parents and their other son, Jack. The entry clearly shows that John and Alice had two children, one of whom had died.

I guess I will never know where the name Vernon Alphonso came from, but the one thing I must find out is who John GASSON was, or rather which John GASSON this is. He is probably the son of my 3x great uncle Edward GASSON, but I need to get a copy of the marriage entry/certificate to make sure.

Impromptu visit to the West Sussex Record Office

8 May

Today I made an impromptu visit to the West Sussex Record Office. I had nothing else planned for today, the weather forecast was not too good so I had decided not to go walking, so last night I printed off my to-do list ready for a visit.

West Sussex Record Office

My to-do list has been growing rapidly as I go through my digital files, and although I hadn’t planned on doing any more research until I had got most of my digital files sorted out, I felt it would be beneficial to get to an archive and do a bit of proper research, if not for my research then at least for my sanity.

The record office closes for lunch on a Saturday, so it split the day quite nicely. In the morning I worked on parish registers and in the afternoon I worked on wills.

The morning went quite well. I was able to pick up several baptisms and burials that I was after from Slaugham, Sussex (mainly GASSONs) and several others dotted around the county that I needed, including the baptism of my mother, but curiously not those of her younger brothers.

The afternoon wasn’t too bad, but I continue to be disappointed by the number of my ancestors that didn’t leave wills. I did however have some luck with my direct PIERCY ancestors. I found wills for both George PIERCY (my 6x great-grandfather) and Thomas PIERCY (my 7x great-grandfather).

Although I wasn’t really prepared for a visit, with my growing to-do list it wasn’t likely that I would come away empty handed, but I was pleasantly surprised at how successful my visit was.

The Funeral of Henry HEMSLEY: The Floral Tributes

29 Apr

As well as detailing the chief mourners at the funeral of Henry HEMSLEY, my 3x great-grandfather, the newspaper report also provided a list of some of the floral tributes at the funeral.

I can only imagine the newspaper reporter standing over the grave with his notebook scribbling down the names and messages on the bouquets and floral displays. I wish I knew who it was I had to thank for capturing all of this information, if only he had owned a camera as well.

To dear father, from Joy and Ada

In loving memory of dear father, Nellie and Ernest

Mr. and Mrs. G. Hemsley, in affectionate remembrance of our dear father

From Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery and son, in affectionate memory of our dear father

In affectionate memory to our dear father, from Emily and Will

In loving remembrance, from Ben and Esther

In affectionate remembrance of dear grandfather, from his loving great-grandchildren, Albert and Cecil

In loving memory of dear granddad, from Harry and family

In affectionate remembrance, from Mr. Lewis Wren and family

In kind remembrance of dear granddad, from Lily Stevens

In loving remembrance, from Tom, Annie, and family

A token of respect to the oldest license holder, from his friends in the Trade at Uckfield, George Benn, J. H. Elliott, A. E. Hill, M. Tourle, J. Webber, A. Waight, and F. White.

Once again there is some useful genealogical information contained amongst the messages and names, and an interesting mention of some of his fellow licensees.

The Funeral of Henry HEMSLEY: The Chief Mourners

28 Apr

Last week I mentioned the discovery of a newspaper report of the funeral of my 3x great-grandfather, Henry HEMSLEY at Framfield, Sussex on the 15th January 1914. The amount of information contained in the report was quite remarkable.

One of the most valuable features was the list of chief mourners at the funeral, which appears to be an almost complete list of Henry’s descendants. Not only does it give the names of the mourners, but it also gives their relationship to Henry.

Mr. H. Hemsley (son)
Mr. and Mrs. Buckley (son-in-law and daughter)
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffery (son-in-law and daughter)
Mr. and Mrs. B. Hemsley (son and daughter-in-law)
Mr. and Mrs. T. Hemsley (son and daughter-in-law)
Mr. and Mrs. J. Hemsley (son and daughter-in-law)
Mr. and Mrs. G. Hemsley (son and daughter-in-law)
Mr. and Mrs. E. Winter (son-in-law and daughter)
Mr. M. Stevens (son-in-law)
Mr. C. Wren (brother-in-law)
Mr. C. Hemsley (grandson) and Mrs. Hemsley
Mr. E. Hemsley (grandson) and Mrs. Hemsley
Mr. Bert Hemsley (grandson) and Mrs. Hemsley
Miss M. Hemsley (granddaughter)
Mrs. Ralph (granddaughter) and Mr. Ralph
Mr. W. W. Buckley (grandson)
Mrs. Westgate (granddaughter) and Mr. Westgate
Mr. J. Buckley (grandson)
Miss C. Buckley (granddaughter)
Mr. H. Jeffery (grandson)
Miss A. Hemsley (granddaughter)
Miss N. Hemsley (granddaughter)
Mr. W. Hemsley (grandson)
Miss G. Winter (granddaughter)
Miss O. Hemsley (granddaughter)
Mr. A. Hemsley (grandson)
Master W. Hemsley (grandson)
Miss Ivy Hemsley (granddaughter)
Miss Lily Stevens (granddaughter)
Mrs. Tapp (niece)
Mr. Tapp (nephew)
Mr. G. Wren (nephew)
Mr. and Mrs. L. Winter (nephew and niece)

I am sure don’t need to point out what a valuable piece of information this is. I now have a list of the children that had married, or those who hadn’t (or whose spouse had died). Going one step further than that I can also see many of Henry’s grandchildren as well.

It is going to take a while to go through this list and confirm the details and enter them into my family tree. Some of the information I already have, some will confirm what I previously suspected and some is completely new to me.

The amount of information contained in this report is really quite staggering and it makes me wonder just how the newspaper reporter went about collecting all this information?

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