Tag Archives: burial records

Challenging times: Processing Framfield burial records

16 Apr

Last week’s challenge was quite helpful in giving my family history a little bit of focus. The danger however is that I am going to get carried away with doing new exciting stuff, and ignore what I am really ought to be doing.

So this week I am going to attempt to process all the Framfield burial records that I gathered at the East Sussex Record Office last month. I have two pages of burials transcribed from the Framfield burial registers, totalling around forty entries in total.

These are from the period 1890 to 1983 and mainly cover the Hemsley family, but there are also a few Drivers, a couple of Trowers, and a handful of others including one Gasson (probably very distantly related).

The “processing” is in parts, firstly copying these entries on to my parish register transcription spreadsheet, so that I can get rid of the paper copy. The second part is taking each entry and entering it in my family tree if possible.

This second part is likely to be the time-consuming part as I know that some of these people won’t be in my family tree and it will be tempting to try to add them in just so that I can “use” the information I have. I am going to try to avoid adding any new people as much as possible, that is a task for another day.

I have already decided that a future job will be to go through my transcription and make sure I can distinguish which entries have been used, then some when down the line I can work on those that haven’t been used.

There is a third part, which is not quite so onerous, that is to make sure I update my to-do list by removing any of the burial records that I have found from the list and noting those that I wasn’t able to find.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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B is for burial records

3 Nov

In this weeks A-Z of English Genealogy it is the turn of the letter B, which in this case stands for burial record. I don’t think there is anything uniquely English about the burial process, although I am sure there have been (and probably still are) some local and regional customs and practices. In this post I wanted to take the opportunity to focus on burial records and in particular where they can be found.

Original burial registers will either be found at the county record office or still with the body responsible whether it is the parish church or some other burial authority. However many of the original registers have been microfilmed or in some cases digitised by the LDS (so check your local Family History Centre). Many of the registers have also been indexed or transcribed, mainly by local family history societies.

Apart from contacting the family history society (or visiting their website) in question, another other good place to find out what is available is the Parish Chest website, although it may not include all available indexes and transcriptions, it does allow online ordering which may not be offered by the individual family history societies.

Whilst many parish register transcriptions and indexes have been published separately, there are still a lot that haven’t. Fortunately a lot of these have been published by the Federation of Family History Societies in the form of the National Burial Index. This index contains nearly 18.5 million entries from throughout England (and Wales), exact coverage details can be found on the FFHS website, where you can drill down through the counties to find the coverage details for each parish.

Coverage does vary from county to county, but with nearly 18.5 million records the overall coverage is pretty good. It is only an index though, guiding you to parish registers you need to be checking for more details. It can be ordered through the FFHS website (check the system requirements first because the CD won’t run on Apple Macs), but these days you might also check your local library for a copy.

The main online data providers (Ancestry.co.uk and findmypast.co.uk) have some burial records, so do The Genealogist, Familyrelatives.com and BMD Registers (also available through the The Genealogist). Deceased Online however is a website dedicated solely to burial and cremation records.

Deceased Online was launched in July 2008 and describes itself as “the first central database of statutory burial and cremation registers for the UK and Republic of Ireland”. What really sets Deceased Online apart from the other indexes and transcriptions is that it focuses on cemetery record, whereas the other mainly focus on burial in the parish churchyard.

So far coverage is limited, but expect to see more records added over the coming months, and those records come in various different forms such as digitised registers, maps of the grave location, photos of the grave location and computer based entries.

I hope you have enjoyed this brief look at burial records, please feel free to let me know in the comments your favourite places (on or offline) for locating English burial records and any other places I have forgotten to mention.

National Burial Index 3rd Edition now available

9 Mar

The third edition of the National Burial Index (NBI) was released (seemingly without much fanfare) by the Federation of Family History Societies (FFHS) at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2010.

National Burial Index

The NBI is a PC only database available on CD (see the website for system requirements). It is described as a complement to the IGI in that it does for burials what the IGI does for baptisms and marriages.

It is only an index, so don’t expect to find full details, and like any indexing project it is liable to errors, so always check the original.

The third edition contains 18.4 million entries, covering most of England and Wales. Some counties are seriously unrepresented, for example there are only 4,000 entries for Devon and more importantly for me, only 12,000 for Hampshire. I am pleased to say Sussex is now well represented. The FFHS website includes a useful breakdown of the coverage of the NBI, down to which parishes and date ranges are included.

The NBI retails at £30 for the full version and £15 for an upgrade from the second edition (if you return the first CD of the second edition). It is available through the FFHS and other genealogy suppliers. It is also listed on Amazon.co.uk although as I write this it is showing as out of stock.

Findmypast.co.uk includes records from an earlier edition of the NBI, but there is no indication whether this will be updated with the records from the new third edition.

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