Tag Archives: australia

Australian Relations: William Joseph Henry BATEMAN (The Early Years: 1882-1898)

28 Jul

This is the first in a series of articles about William Joseph Henry BATEMAN and his family from Australia. This is an ongoing research project and so far much of the research is based on index entries and is unverified, if you have more information or corrections then please get in touch.

William Joseph Henry (WJH) BATEMAN was my 2x great-uncle. He was born in Brighton, Sussex on the 19th January 1882. His birth was registered in Q1 1882 in the Brighton Registration District, although I don’t have a copy of his birth certificate yet. So far I have yet to find a record of his baptism, although I haven’t made a thorough search of all the parishes in Brighton yet.

His parents were Henry BATEMAN and Dorothy Isabella KINGHORN who were married in Brighton Registration District in Q4 1881, again I don’t have a copy of their certificate yet nor have I found their entry in the parish registers. This is an interesting marriage, Henry was from Gloucestershire and Dorothy was from London, and it appears that they met whilst working at Spratton, Northamptonshire.

In a very short space of time the couple have moved to Brighton, got married and had a child. The speed with which this happened makes me suspect this was all rather unplanned. In the 1881 census they are living close together (probably both working at Spratton Hall), by the end of the year they are married and at the start of the following year Dorothy gives birth to a son.

I don’t know a lot about WJH’s early years, he appears in the 1891 census as a nine year old boy living with his parents at 19 Yardley Street, Preston, Sussex (just on the outskirts of Brighton). Also living there with WJH is his one year old sister Dorothy May (my great-grandmother) and his grandmother Isabella KINGHORN.

The family appear to have moved to Yardley Street around 1889, but I don’t know where they were before then, other than Brighton. I have yet to find out which school WJH attended and when, but I am sure that given time I will uncover the details. Around 1897 the family moved to Hurstpierpoint, Sussex although it is not known whether WJH was still living at home at that time.

What is known is that at the start of 1898 WJH joined the Royal Navy and it was this that ultimately led to him settling in Australia several years later.

Personal Genealogy Update: Week 30

25 Jul

You will no doubt be getting tired of hearing the fact that I have struggled to do any genealogy this week, but that is the case again this week.

I hate to go on about the fact, but I have probably spent more time worrying about how I am going to find time for family history than actually doing any. The good news is that I am starting to get into a routine and I can actually see a way in which I am going to be able integrate research into my daily routine.

I think being organised is going to be the critical factor, that and mobile working. The basic problem is that it takes me about two hours to get to work, however much of that time is spent just waiting. I need to utilise this time better to get more done, whether it is actually family history research, blogging or something else that needs taking care of.

I did a little bit more work on on the BATEMANs of Australia using the new BMD indexes on Ancestry.com.au, but would still like to find out more, so I need to use the dates I have found and see if I can find marriage details or an obituary for any of them in the National Library of Australia newspaper collections.

The rest of this week will be spent trying to fit in any family history research that is possible, probably just filling in gaps and creating more to-do items for when I next get to an archive.

Australian BMD indexes on Ancestry.com.au

16 Jul

The release of the Australian BMD indexes on Ancestry.com.au is great news for my BATEMAN research. As most of the records relating to this family are connected with the state of Victoria I have so far been limiting the amount of index searches I do, because the Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages charge for their index search results.

I know the charges for index searches weren’t particularly high, but with an Ancestry Worldwide membership I can now search to my heart’s content and can also extend to some of my other surnames just to see who might have ended in Australia as well. I am sure there are more than just the BATEMANs who went out there.

Interestingly a search for the surname GASSON in the death indexes only returns 81 results, and the surname TROWER returns only 49, both of which are a lot lower than I would have expected. The result might reflect the coverage of the indexes more than the number of my relations that actually left these shores.

One thing that doesn’t seem clear from the Ancestry web pages is the coverage dates for these indexes. It correctly states that the dates when civil registration started varies for each state or territory, but doesn’t mention that they also appear to have different cut-off dates for public access to the indexes.

As an example, although the birth index quotes the dates 1788-1922, there don’t appear to be any Victoria births after 1909. I haven’t played around to find the limits for all event types and places, but don’t be surprised if you don’t find the record you are looking for, despite what the collection title might say. The shame is that there is not an easy way to find out, unless I am missing something.

Personal Genealogy Update: Week 26

27 Jun

Time for another confession, I really struggled last week to actually do any genealogy. I blame two things for this:

  1. The warm summer evenings, perfect for walking or sitting in the garden doing nothing.
  2. I can’t decide what to do next.

I need to stop beating myself up for not doing any family history, but I really feel that I should be doing some research, but haven’t been able to pinpoint what I want to do.

I did a bit of work around the MITCHELLs and Exton, Hampshire but I just couldn’t get enthused about it, which disappoints me. I fear all that time organising files and folders has spoilt my appetite for research.

I do have plan though for kick-starting my research, and that is in part because of the Capital Ring walk on Saturday. I have given myself a challenge, to find out why my grandfather was at school in the London Borough of Greenwich between 1917 and 1924, and when did he come back to Sussex after he finished school.

I will explain more about this challenge later, but for now I think I have settled on three projects to concentrate on, which is more than enough for the time being, and allows me some flexibility to take on other bits and pieces as they turn up.

The three projects are:

  1. Finish off my research into the GEERINGs of Hailsham, Sussex.
  2. Investigate and write about the life of William Joseph Henry BATEMAN of Victoria, Australia.
  3. Find out why my grandfather Charles Percy GASSON was in Greenwich, London.

Personal Genealogy Update: Week 24

13 Jun

Although most of last week was spent sorting out files and folders, I did manage to do quite a bit of new research as well. This is just what I needed, starting the transition from organising to researching.

Hopefully next week will see the bulk of my organising done. Of course it will never be completely done, as new material will be turning up all the time in need of processing and filing, but at least I have everything in place and a system that should make it easier in future to know where to filing things, and where to find them when I need them.

Most of the research was about the branch of BATEMAN family that grew up in Australia. The pursuit of the descendants of my 2x great-uncle William Joseph Henry BATEMAN is something I will be taking on in the forthcoming weeks. As part of this I want to try and write some posts about what I already know about the family.

In terms of organising, the GASSON surname folder is virtually sorted and that only leaves the GEERING folder to go. It is my intention to get both of those folders completed this week, and by the following week I want to have gone through all the surname folders and make sure everything is as it should be and I will produce a template that will enable me at a glance to see where new information fits into the system.

The amount of new BATEMAN research meant I didn’t get chance to start going through my database and start defining some goals, I would like to try and start that this week, although I don’t expect to complete it. I do however need to decide which projects I am going to be working on next.

One of those projects might involve the WRIGHT/SHORNDEN family of Alton, Hampshire. Having visited Alton last weekend I would like to find out more about their time in Alton. One long term goal is to find out how they came to be in Hampshire in the first place, when they were previously in Kent.

Is now the time for some BATEMAN research?

9 Jun

The Australian branch of the BATEMAN family seem to have found their way to the forefront of my family history and are demanding my attention.

A couple of days ago there was the postcard of the ship that my 2x great-grandmother Dorothy Isabella BATEMAN sailed to Australia on, I am trying to finish sorting out the BATEMAN surname folder and one of my goals for this year was to explore the Australian branch of the family further.

These last couple of days I have been doing some digging around online and have accumulated even more information to process and sort out. Now I have reached a stage where I need to decide what to do next? I am at the point of having to invest proper time and money before going much further.

Do I have the time to learn about a completely new country? Which sort of record types are available? Who holds what? What is online and what is not? There are some great websites I have already discovered, but I need to explore them further. Do I have the time and is now the right time to do it?

The answer is that I do want to do it, but first of all I need to get all my organising done. The more I think about it, the more this project seems like a good idea. It is a perfect compliment to some of my other more local projects, because I am sure it is going to be pretty much all done remotely, whereas something like my GEERING research is going to be mainly in local archives.

So my first step is to post a summary of what I already know on this blog, just in case their are any cousins already researching the family from the other side of the world. Then I need to check online trees to see if anyone else has posted any matching data. That should give me time to get my data sorted, define what I want to achieve, and learn where I need to be looking to achieve it.

Picture Postcard Parade: SS Berrima

7 Jun

This postcard is a real change from the postcards I have been posting recently, I have been searching for a decent picture of the SS Berrima for a couple of years, and this is the best yet.

SS Berrima

There is no indication whatsoever as to who the photographer was, who published the card, when it was published or where the photograph was taken.

The only clue is the date that the Berrima was in service. According to the Clydebuilt Ships Database, she was launched in 1913 and was sold for scrap in 1930 (Wikipedia has the date as 1939). She was owned by P&O and sailed on their branch service, between London and Australia (Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney) by way of South Africa (Cape Town).

It was aboard the Berrima that my 2x great-grandmother Dorothy Isabella BATEMAN sailed to Melbourne in 1921, presumably to live with her son William Joseph Henry BATEMAN after the death of her husband Henry.

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