Family Heirloom: Grandad’s Shoe Brush

1 Apr

Some family heirlooms are more useful than others and this is definitely one of them. Some are meant to be put on display, but this one lives in the cupboard under the kitchen sink.

This is my grandad’s army issue shoe brush, used by him during has service with the Royal Engineers and used by me this morning to polish my shoes ready for work on Monday morning.

Although it is not particularly clear I know it was his brush because it has his service number (1879445) stamped on the top.

One side has the words “WARRANTED ALL HORSE-HAIR  1939″, which is presumably the year and on the other side are the words “BEECHWOOD LTD” which is probably the manufacturer and a War Department broad arrow.

I’m sure my grandad would be pleased to know it is still being used after all these years.

Copyright © 2012 John Gasson.
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4 Responses to “Family Heirloom: Grandad’s Shoe Brush”

  1. Yolanda Presant April 2, 2012 at 6:13 pm #

    I’m sure he would! They made thngs to last back then didn’t they?

  2. Houstory Publishing September 6, 2012 at 9:20 pm #

    I love this post. :)

  3. Scharlie March 29, 2013 at 12:17 pm #

    I saw your granddad’s shoe brush with great interest! I have inherited a similar looking brush from my father , a German soldier, who died young in worldwar 2 in the Russian trenches. I treasure this item but it looks like a body brush, no traces of oils or shoe polish. I tried to find out if it was part of army equipment, but could find nothing. I think he used it to brush the body against the cold.
    Forgive me for writing such an epic, but the picture of your granddad’s brush led to it.
    Regards
    Scharli

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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