Before I leave Beachy Head

1 Jun

I may have run out of postcards of Beachy Head for the time being, but before I leave the subject of Beachy Head I would like to share the description from the 1898 edition of Black’s Guide to Sussex and its Watering Places.

Beachy Head is described in the chapter on Eastbourne, which it describes as:

This young town, though its population numbers only as yet some 40,000, is the most distinguished watering-place on the Sussex coast, still growing as an example of what can be done by enterprise and judicious patronage along with natural advantages

The description itself is under the heading of Excursions from Eastbourne:

Beachy Head is of course the chief lion here, rising grandly to a height of over 500 feet, about 2 miles west of the town. (Cab fare, with fifteen minutes’ stop, 6s.) There are, at least, three routes-the new carriage drive, bending back over the Downs by the Racecourse ; a middle way that starts from Meads by the back of the Convalescent Hospital, the easiest for walking ; and the rough path by the cliff edge ; or one might take the beach, if the tide be not coming in, whence a path mounts the chalky cliffs to the Coastguard Signal House.

It is clear from the guide that Beachy Head was already attracting plenty of visitors:

On this part of the Downs, there is little likelihood of going astray for want of fellow travellers. Once the climb is over, we have an easy walk over elastic turf that makes walking a delight, unless in very dry weather, when the footing may be slippery. The highest point is marked by the Signal Station, behind which an hotel and restaurant has been established as a branch of the Queen’s/ The view is an extensive one in clear weather, taking in the Isle of Wight, and sometimes even the French coast. Unless by the path below the Signal Station, already mentioned, visitors would do well to be cautious in scrambling upon the crumbling chalk edges, where several accidents have taken place.

This edition of Black’s Guide to Sussex and its Watering Places was the eleventh edition, published in 1898 by Adam and Charles Black of London, England.

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