Madness Monday: Using non-asylum sources for asylum research

18 May

Although I was still waiting for permission to view the next set of asylum records for George Thomas GASSON, there were other records I could look at without any restrictions.

Of course the 1911 census wasn’t available then (and I still haven’t looked in there for him yet), but I could still access death and burial records. I suppose one could view his death as a release from the asylum back into civil and ecclesiastical hands.

Firstly there was his death certificate, this confirmed he had died in the asylum on the 9th May 1922 and gave his cause of death as exhaustion of dysentery (10 days) and senile dementia (several years). This was rather confusing, I had found no reference of dementia in his previous notes, is this what he was actually suffering from all along? had this developed over the years? or did they just not know what to call it?

Next came burial records. I guessed that he would have been buried at Hellingly, Sussex because I had not found a burial record back at Bolney or the surrounding parishes. Sure enough when I checked the burial records for Hellingly (at the East Sussex Record Office) there he was, being buried at the burial ground at Hellingly on the 13th May 1922 in grave number 1082B.

The register of graves for the burial ground threw up one confusing issue, it listed another person in that grave as well, she was Ada Elizabeth RICHARDSON who was buried on the 7th May 1964. This confusion was soon cleared up by the present parish clerk, as the grave had not been purchased by the family it would have been re-used at a later date.

This however brought up another issue, the grave hadn’t been purchased, but how many (if any) of the family actually knew he was buried there? did any of them attend the funeral? and who paid the interment fees of 7s 6d?

With the help of a plan of the burial ground at the East Sussex Record Office and Google Maps I have been able to identify the spot where George Thomas is buried with reasonable accuracy. It doesn’t appear to be marked (which was confirmed by the parish clerk) but I shall still go and pay a visit one day soon.

I know that I am probably one of only a handful of his descendants that knows the whereabouts of his last resting place, but what is sadder still is that I might be the only family member past or present that has visited his grave.

[to be continued]

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One Response to “Madness Monday: Using non-asylum sources for asylum research”

  1. Ivy S. MacMahon August 22, 2012 at 3:45 pm #

    Thank you so much for this information as I am seeking my Aunt’s demise at Hellingly and wonder if you would help me.? Ivy MacMahon

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